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Article: Attributional style and school truancy

TitleAttributional style and school truancy
Authors
KeywordsAttributional style
School truancy
Issue Date2001
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03004430.asp
Citation
Early Child Development and Care, 2001, v. 169, p. 21-38 How to Cite?
AbstractRelatively little research has been directed toward exploring cognitive variables that may characterize students with poor school attendance. A handful of studies has examined school attendance in relation to locus of control, but none has explored its relationship to “attributional style”. This article presents the findings of a pilot study which compared a small sample of truants and non‐truants on locus of control and attributional style. The findings suggest that attributional style is a significant cognitive factor in explaining why some students play truant from school but others do not, even though they are under the influence of similar school conditions. Specifically, truants tended to explain failures as due to internal, stable and global factors, whereas non‐truants tended to explain failures as due to external, unstable and specific factors. On the other hand, truants tended to explain success as due to external, unstable and specific factors; whereas non‐truants tended to explain success as due to internal, stable and global factors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222960
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.405

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTam, TSK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T02:35:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-17T02:35:20Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.citationEarly Child Development and Care, 2001, v. 169, p. 21-38-
dc.identifier.issn0300-4430-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222960-
dc.description.abstractRelatively little research has been directed toward exploring cognitive variables that may characterize students with poor school attendance. A handful of studies has examined school attendance in relation to locus of control, but none has explored its relationship to “attributional style”. This article presents the findings of a pilot study which compared a small sample of truants and non‐truants on locus of control and attributional style. The findings suggest that attributional style is a significant cognitive factor in explaining why some students play truant from school but others do not, even though they are under the influence of similar school conditions. Specifically, truants tended to explain failures as due to internal, stable and global factors, whereas non‐truants tended to explain failures as due to external, unstable and specific factors. On the other hand, truants tended to explain success as due to external, unstable and specific factors; whereas non‐truants tended to explain success as due to internal, stable and global factors.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03004430.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Child Development and Care-
dc.subjectAttributional style-
dc.subjectSchool truancy-
dc.titleAttributional style and school truancy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTam, TSK: tsktam@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0300443011690102-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48449091485-
dc.identifier.hkuros64838-
dc.identifier.volume169-
dc.identifier.spage21-
dc.identifier.epage38-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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