File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Assessment of hemodynamic changes in rat stomachs by laser Doppler velocimetry and reflectance spectrophotometry: effects of ethanol and prostaglandin E2 under ischemic and congestive conditions

TitleAssessment of hemodynamic changes in rat stomachs by laser Doppler velocimetry and reflectance spectrophotometry: effects of ethanol and prostaglandin E2 under ischemic and congestive conditions
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/DIG
Citation
Digestion, 1994, v. 55 n. 6, p. 389-394 How to Cite?
AbstractOne of the ulcerogenic mechanisms by which ethanol induces mucosal lesions in the stomach is the depression of gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF). The goal of this study was to determine whether lesion formation is the result of vascular ischemia alone or ischemia combined with congestion. The aims of this study were to answer this question by evaluating the relationship between GMBF, oxygen saturation (ISO2) and hemoglobin volume (IHb) in the gastric mucosa under the influences of ethanol and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the ischemic and congestive states, using a laser Doppler flowmeter and tissue spectrum analyzer. Ligation of the gastric celiac artery or vein markedly decreased the GMBF and the ISO2 level. The former procedure also reduced but the latter increased the IHb level. Ethanol administration produced effects similar to venous ligation, i.e. vascular stasis with ischemia. There was a negative correlation between GMBF and severity of lesion formation after ethanol administration. However, at the lesion site all the hemodynamic parameters were significantly reduced, indicating that a necrotic condition had occurred. PGE2 preincubation (25 micrograms) elevated GMBF, ISO2 and IHb levels. It also alleviated the reduction of blood flow induced by ethanol and increased the recovery rate of GMBF and ISO2 after the release of arterial or venous ligation. It is concluded that the decrease in blood flow due to ethanol is probably caused by constriction of venules rather than arterioles inside the mucosa, and this effect could lead to vascular congestion. PGE2 probably dilates both arterioles and venules in the gastric mucosa and thereby increases the blood flow in the gastric mucosa.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222958
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.884
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.953

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCho, CH-
dc.contributor.authorChen, BW-
dc.contributor.authorHo, CS-
dc.contributor.authorKo, JKS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, SK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-17T01:32:06Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-17T01:32:06Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.citationDigestion, 1994, v. 55 n. 6, p. 389-394-
dc.identifier.issn0012-2823-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222958-
dc.description.abstractOne of the ulcerogenic mechanisms by which ethanol induces mucosal lesions in the stomach is the depression of gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF). The goal of this study was to determine whether lesion formation is the result of vascular ischemia alone or ischemia combined with congestion. The aims of this study were to answer this question by evaluating the relationship between GMBF, oxygen saturation (ISO2) and hemoglobin volume (IHb) in the gastric mucosa under the influences of ethanol and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the ischemic and congestive states, using a laser Doppler flowmeter and tissue spectrum analyzer. Ligation of the gastric celiac artery or vein markedly decreased the GMBF and the ISO2 level. The former procedure also reduced but the latter increased the IHb level. Ethanol administration produced effects similar to venous ligation, i.e. vascular stasis with ischemia. There was a negative correlation between GMBF and severity of lesion formation after ethanol administration. However, at the lesion site all the hemodynamic parameters were significantly reduced, indicating that a necrotic condition had occurred. PGE2 preincubation (25 micrograms) elevated GMBF, ISO2 and IHb levels. It also alleviated the reduction of blood flow induced by ethanol and increased the recovery rate of GMBF and ISO2 after the release of arterial or venous ligation. It is concluded that the decrease in blood flow due to ethanol is probably caused by constriction of venules rather than arterioles inside the mucosa, and this effect could lead to vascular congestion. PGE2 probably dilates both arterioles and venules in the gastric mucosa and thereby increases the blood flow in the gastric mucosa.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/DIG-
dc.relation.ispartofDigestion-
dc.rightsDigestion. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subject.meshGastric mucosa - blood supply - drug effects - physiology-
dc.subject.meshEthanol - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshDinoprostone - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshIschemia - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshLaser-doppler flowmetry-
dc.titleAssessment of hemodynamic changes in rat stomachs by laser Doppler velocimetry and reflectance spectrophotometry: effects of ethanol and prostaglandin E2 under ischemic and congestive conditions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCho, CH: chcho@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, SK: hrmelsk@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000201170-
dc.identifier.pmid7705551-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028605208-
dc.identifier.hkuros6340-
dc.identifier.volume55-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage389-
dc.identifier.epage394-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats