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Article: Antiplatelet resistance with aspirin and clopidogrel: is it real and does it matter?

TitleAntiplatelet resistance with aspirin and clopidogrel: is it real and does it matter?
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherCurrent Science Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/currcardiolrep/
Citation
Current Cardiology Reports, 2006, v. 8 n. 4, p. 301-306 How to Cite?
AbstractPlatelets play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of ischemic complications of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Aspirin and clopidogrel are oral antiplatelet drugs that have been shown to reduce adverse clinical events across the wide spectrum of patients with atherothrombotic disease. However, recurrent ischemic events still occur in a significant proportion of patients despite treatment with these antiplatelet drugs. The concept of antiplatelet resistance therefore emerges. Although uniform definitions and standardized assays are not yet available, numerous studies have documented the interindividual variability in platelet responsiveness to oral antiplatelet drugs. Evidence is also accumulating to demonstrate that hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet drugs in the laboratory (ie, resistance) is associated with adverse clinical events in different patient populations. Clinical application of antiplatelet resistance will require proof from prospective randomized trials that modifications of antiplatelet therapy based on tests of antiplatelet responsiveness will improve the outcomes of patients with antiplatelet resistance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222805
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.83
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.721

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, WH-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-01T03:06:48Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-01T03:06:48Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Cardiology Reports, 2006, v. 8 n. 4, p. 301-306-
dc.identifier.issn1523-3782-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222805-
dc.description.abstractPlatelets play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of ischemic complications of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Aspirin and clopidogrel are oral antiplatelet drugs that have been shown to reduce adverse clinical events across the wide spectrum of patients with atherothrombotic disease. However, recurrent ischemic events still occur in a significant proportion of patients despite treatment with these antiplatelet drugs. The concept of antiplatelet resistance therefore emerges. Although uniform definitions and standardized assays are not yet available, numerous studies have documented the interindividual variability in platelet responsiveness to oral antiplatelet drugs. Evidence is also accumulating to demonstrate that hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet drugs in the laboratory (ie, resistance) is associated with adverse clinical events in different patient populations. Clinical application of antiplatelet resistance will require proof from prospective randomized trials that modifications of antiplatelet therapy based on tests of antiplatelet responsiveness will improve the outcomes of patients with antiplatelet resistance.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCurrent Science Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/currcardiolrep/-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Cardiology Reports-
dc.subject.meshAspirin - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshCoronary Artery Disease - drug therapy-
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Aggregation Inhibitors - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials as Topic-
dc.subject.meshTiclopidine - analogs & derivatives/pharmacology-
dc.titleAntiplatelet resistance with aspirin and clopidogrel: is it real and does it matter?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, WH: whchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11886-006-0063-5-
dc.identifier.pmid16822366-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage301-
dc.identifier.epage306-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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