File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Have a break and the changing demands of trade mark registration

TitleHave a break and the changing demands of trade mark registration
Authors
KeywordsSlogans
Trade mark directive (2008/ 95/EC)
Specsavers international healthcare Ltd v Asda Stores Ltd (Case C-252/12) (2013)
HAVE A BREAK trade Mark (1993)
Public interest
Trade mark registration
Société des produits Nestlé v Mars UK Ltd (Case C-353/03) (2005)
Issue Date2015
Citation
Queen Mary Journal of Intellectual Property, 2015, v. 5, n. 2, p. 132-156 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. This article explores, from the point of view of both law and linguistics, how far the application and effect of the law of registered trade marks is shaped not only by legislative initiative but also by changing consumer behaviour and the shifting linguistic currency of the particular signs used (or proposed for use) as marks. It does so by focusing on the thirty-year campaign to register HAVE A BREAK for a chocolate bar, marketed as ‘KitKat’. It considers the changing approach of courts both to inherent distinctiveness and to distinctiveness acquired through use. It also considers the relationship between the average consumer test for distinctiveness and the public interest in leaving certain signs free. It suggests that while the present trade mark regime is open to the registration of slogans, it is not clear that courts have sufficiently considered the public interest implications of increasing trade mark protection in this way.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222700
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.116

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Jennifer-
dc.contributor.authorDurant, Alan-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T03:37:02Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-19T03:37:02Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationQueen Mary Journal of Intellectual Property, 2015, v. 5, n. 2, p. 132-156-
dc.identifier.issn2045-9807-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222700-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. This article explores, from the point of view of both law and linguistics, how far the application and effect of the law of registered trade marks is shaped not only by legislative initiative but also by changing consumer behaviour and the shifting linguistic currency of the particular signs used (or proposed for use) as marks. It does so by focusing on the thirty-year campaign to register HAVE A BREAK for a chocolate bar, marketed as ‘KitKat’. It considers the changing approach of courts both to inherent distinctiveness and to distinctiveness acquired through use. It also considers the relationship between the average consumer test for distinctiveness and the public interest in leaving certain signs free. It suggests that while the present trade mark regime is open to the registration of slogans, it is not clear that courts have sufficiently considered the public interest implications of increasing trade mark protection in this way.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofQueen Mary Journal of Intellectual Property-
dc.subjectSlogans-
dc.subjectTrade mark directive (2008/ 95/EC)-
dc.subjectSpecsavers international healthcare Ltd v Asda Stores Ltd (Case C-252/12) (2013)-
dc.subjectHAVE A BREAK trade Mark (1993)-
dc.subjectPublic interest-
dc.subjectTrade mark registration-
dc.subjectSociété des produits Nestlé v Mars UK Ltd (Case C-353/03) (2005)-
dc.titleHave a break and the changing demands of trade mark registration-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84947914962-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage132-
dc.identifier.epage156-
dc.identifier.eissn2045-9815-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats