File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Changes in 'extra' food intake among Australian children between 1995 and 2007

TitleChanges in 'extra' food intake among Australian children between 1995 and 2007
Authors
KeywordsFood habits
Nutrition surveys
Energy intake
Child nutrition
Australia
Issue Date2011
Citation
Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 2011, v. 5, n. 1, p. e55-e63 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine the consumption patterns of energy-dense, nutrient-poor 'extra' foods among Australian children and to determine any changes in consumption since the 1995 National Nutrition Survey (1995 NNS). Methods: 'Extra' food consumption was analysed by age group and gender using 24-h recall data from the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2007 Survey; n = 4380) and the 1995 NNS (n = 2435). Differences in percent consuming, amounts consumed and percent energy contribution were assessed. Results: 'Extra' foods contributed 35% to daily energy intake in the 2007 survey, ranging from 24% in the 2-3 year olds to 38% in the 9-13 and 14-16 year olds. The foods contributing most to energy intake included 'fried potatoes' (2.9%), 'cakes, muffins, slices' (2.9%) and 'potato crisps and similar snacks' (2.6%). Compared to the 1995 NNS, total energy intake was significantly lower in the 2007 Survey (8621 kJ in 1995 versus 8330 kJ in 2007), as was the consumption of 'extra' foods (both in terms of weight and energy) (3645 kJ in 1995 versus 3049 kJ in 2007). All age groups reported a decline in energy intake from 'extra' foods of approximately 600 kJ. Conclusion: The overall consumption of 'extra' foods seems to have decreased from 1995 to 2007. However, 'extra' foods continue to be over-consumed by Australian children and continuous monitoring of 'extra' foods consumption is highly warranted. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222635
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.094
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.622

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRangan, Anna M.-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Janis-
dc.contributor.authorFlood, Victoria M.-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, Jimmy Chun Yu-
dc.contributor.authorGill, Timothy P.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T03:36:41Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-19T03:36:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationObesity Research and Clinical Practice, 2011, v. 5, n. 1, p. e55-e63-
dc.identifier.issn1871-403X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222635-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the consumption patterns of energy-dense, nutrient-poor 'extra' foods among Australian children and to determine any changes in consumption since the 1995 National Nutrition Survey (1995 NNS). Methods: 'Extra' food consumption was analysed by age group and gender using 24-h recall data from the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2007 Survey; n = 4380) and the 1995 NNS (n = 2435). Differences in percent consuming, amounts consumed and percent energy contribution were assessed. Results: 'Extra' foods contributed 35% to daily energy intake in the 2007 survey, ranging from 24% in the 2-3 year olds to 38% in the 9-13 and 14-16 year olds. The foods contributing most to energy intake included 'fried potatoes' (2.9%), 'cakes, muffins, slices' (2.9%) and 'potato crisps and similar snacks' (2.6%). Compared to the 1995 NNS, total energy intake was significantly lower in the 2007 Survey (8621 kJ in 1995 versus 8330 kJ in 2007), as was the consumption of 'extra' foods (both in terms of weight and energy) (3645 kJ in 1995 versus 3049 kJ in 2007). All age groups reported a decline in energy intake from 'extra' foods of approximately 600 kJ. Conclusion: The overall consumption of 'extra' foods seems to have decreased from 1995 to 2007. However, 'extra' foods continue to be over-consumed by Australian children and continuous monitoring of 'extra' foods consumption is highly warranted. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofObesity Research and Clinical Practice-
dc.subjectFood habits-
dc.subjectNutrition surveys-
dc.subjectEnergy intake-
dc.subjectChild nutrition-
dc.subjectAustralia-
dc.titleChanges in 'extra' food intake among Australian children between 1995 and 2007-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.orcp.2010.12.001-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79151473249-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagee55-
dc.identifier.epagee63-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats