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Article: Birds of a feather and birds flocking together: Physical versus behavioral cues may lead to trait- versus goal-based group perception

TitleBirds of a feather and birds flocking together: Physical versus behavioral cues may lead to trait- versus goal-based group perception
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/psp.html
Citation
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2006, v. 90 n. 3, p. 368-381 How to Cite?
AbstractEntitativity perception refers to the perception of a collection of individuals as a group. The authors propose 2 perceptual-inferential bases of entitativity perception. First, perceivers would expect a collection of individuals with similar physical traits to possess common psychological traits. Second, perceivers watching a group of individuals engage in concerted behavior would infer that these individuals have common goals. Thus, both similarity in physical traits (e.g., same skin color) and concerted collective behavior (e.g., same movement) would evoke perception of group entitativity. Results from 5 experiments show that same group movement invariably leads to common goal inferences, increased perceived cohesiveness, and increased perceived entitativity. Moreover, same skin color evokes inferences of group traits and increases perceived homogeneity and perceived entitativity but only when skin color is diagnostic of group membership. Copyright (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222432
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.736
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.040

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, GWM-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CY-
dc.contributor.authorWan, C-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-18T06:19:50Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-18T06:19:50Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2006, v. 90 n. 3, p. 368-381-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3514-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222432-
dc.description.abstractEntitativity perception refers to the perception of a collection of individuals as a group. The authors propose 2 perceptual-inferential bases of entitativity perception. First, perceivers would expect a collection of individuals with similar physical traits to possess common psychological traits. Second, perceivers watching a group of individuals engage in concerted behavior would infer that these individuals have common goals. Thus, both similarity in physical traits (e.g., same skin color) and concerted collective behavior (e.g., same movement) would evoke perception of group entitativity. Results from 5 experiments show that same group movement invariably leads to common goal inferences, increased perceived cohesiveness, and increased perceived entitativity. Moreover, same skin color evokes inferences of group traits and increases perceived homogeneity and perceived entitativity but only when skin color is diagnostic of group membership. Copyright (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/psp.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Personality and Social Psychology-
dc.rightsJournal of Personality and Social Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.rightsThis article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.-
dc.subject.meshCues-
dc.subject.meshGoals-
dc.subject.meshGroup Structure-
dc.subject.meshPsychology, Social-
dc.subject.meshQuantitative Trait, Heritable-
dc.titleBirds of a feather and birds flocking together: Physical versus behavioral cues may lead to trait- versus goal-based group perception-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0022-3514.90.3.368-
dc.identifier.pmid16594825-
dc.identifier.volume90-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage368-
dc.identifier.epage381-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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