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Book Chapter: Trafficking and gender

TitleTrafficking and gender
Authors
KeywordsEconomics and finance
Radical and feminist economics
Social policy and sociology
Family and gender policy
Issue Date2013
PublisherEdward Elgar Pub. Ltd
Citation
Trafficking and gender. In Figart, DM & Warnecke, TL (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, p. 542-558. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub. Ltd, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractWhen most people talk about gender and trafficking, they usually (but not always) are talking about trafficking of women. Most of the current evidence on trafficking focuses exclusively on women, and the intersection of men’s gendered experiences and trafficking unfortunately remains a great gap in research. This chapter explores the impact of a gendered discourse on women. Policy and public conversations around trafficking reflect social ideas about women, specifically ideas about women’s vulnerabilities. In addition, the chapter outlines the connections often made between trafficking and the gendered experiences of women, and identifies when these links help or hurt our ability to work for the rights of trafficked persons and other directly affected groups such as migrants. For example, trafficking prevention activities can be made more effective by incorporating an understanding of the way gender-based discrimination increases the risk of trafficking. But when gender is linked with trafficking incorrectly (such as when all prostitution or sex work is defined as trafficking), it has actively harmed certain groups of women, including migrant women and sex workers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222234
ISBN
Series/Report no.Elgar original reference

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHam, J-
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-07T07:37:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-07T07:37:43Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationTrafficking and gender. In Figart, DM & Warnecke, TL (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, p. 542-558. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub. Ltd, 2013-
dc.identifier.isbn9780857930941-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222234-
dc.description.abstractWhen most people talk about gender and trafficking, they usually (but not always) are talking about trafficking of women. Most of the current evidence on trafficking focuses exclusively on women, and the intersection of men’s gendered experiences and trafficking unfortunately remains a great gap in research. This chapter explores the impact of a gendered discourse on women. Policy and public conversations around trafficking reflect social ideas about women, specifically ideas about women’s vulnerabilities. In addition, the chapter outlines the connections often made between trafficking and the gendered experiences of women, and identifies when these links help or hurt our ability to work for the rights of trafficked persons and other directly affected groups such as migrants. For example, trafficking prevention activities can be made more effective by incorporating an understanding of the way gender-based discrimination increases the risk of trafficking. But when gender is linked with trafficking incorrectly (such as when all prostitution or sex work is defined as trafficking), it has actively harmed certain groups of women, including migrant women and sex workers.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherEdward Elgar Pub. Ltd-
dc.relation.ispartofHandbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesElgar original reference-
dc.subjectEconomics and finance-
dc.subjectRadical and feminist economics-
dc.subjectSocial policy and sociology-
dc.subjectFamily and gender policy-
dc.titleTrafficking and gender-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailHam, J: jham@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHam, J=rp02065-
dc.identifier.doi10.4337/9780857930958.00048-
dc.identifier.spage542-
dc.identifier.epage558-
dc.publisher.placeCheltenham-

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