File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Investigation of key interventions for shigellosis outbreak control in China

TitleInvestigation of key interventions for shigellosis outbreak control in China
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2014, v. 9, n. 4 How to Cite?
AbstractShigellosis is a major public health concern in China, where waterborne disease outbreaks are common. Shigellosiscontaining strategies, mostly single or multiple interventions, are implemented by primary-level health departments. Systematic assessment of the effectiveness of these measures is scarce. To estimate the efficacy of commonly used intervention strategies, we developed a Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious/Asymptomatic-Recovered-Water model. No intervention was predicted to result in a total attack rate (TAR) of 90% of the affected population (95% confidence interval [CI]: 86.65-92.80) and duration of outbreak (DO) of 89 days, and the use of single-intervention strategies can be futile or even counter-productive. Prophylactics and water disinfection did not improve TAR or DO. School closure for up to 3 weeks did not help but only increased DO. Isolation alone significantly increased DO. Only antibiotics treatment could shorten the DO to 35 days with TAR unaffected. We observed that these intervention effects were additive when in combined usage under most circumstances. Combined intervention ''Isolation+antibiotics+prophylactics+water disinfection'' was predicted to result in the lowest TAR (41.9%, 95%CI: 36.97-47.04%) and shortest DO (28 days). Our actual Shigellosis control implementation that also included school closure for 1 week, attained comparable results and the modeling produced an epidemic curve of Shigellosis highly similar to our actual outbreak data. This lends a strong support to the reality of our model that provides a possible reference for public health professionals to evaluate their strategies towards Shigellosis control. © 2014 Chen et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222158

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Tianmu-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Ross Ka Kit-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Zi-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Ruchun-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xixing-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lijie-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T06:49:04Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T06:49:04Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2014, v. 9, n. 4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222158-
dc.description.abstractShigellosis is a major public health concern in China, where waterborne disease outbreaks are common. Shigellosiscontaining strategies, mostly single or multiple interventions, are implemented by primary-level health departments. Systematic assessment of the effectiveness of these measures is scarce. To estimate the efficacy of commonly used intervention strategies, we developed a Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious/Asymptomatic-Recovered-Water model. No intervention was predicted to result in a total attack rate (TAR) of 90% of the affected population (95% confidence interval [CI]: 86.65-92.80) and duration of outbreak (DO) of 89 days, and the use of single-intervention strategies can be futile or even counter-productive. Prophylactics and water disinfection did not improve TAR or DO. School closure for up to 3 weeks did not help but only increased DO. Isolation alone significantly increased DO. Only antibiotics treatment could shorten the DO to 35 days with TAR unaffected. We observed that these intervention effects were additive when in combined usage under most circumstances. Combined intervention ''Isolation+antibiotics+prophylactics+water disinfection'' was predicted to result in the lowest TAR (41.9%, 95%CI: 36.97-47.04%) and shortest DO (28 days). Our actual Shigellosis control implementation that also included school closure for 1 week, attained comparable results and the modeling produced an epidemic curve of Shigellosis highly similar to our actual outbreak data. This lends a strong support to the reality of our model that provides a possible reference for public health professionals to evaluate their strategies towards Shigellosis control. © 2014 Chen et al.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.titleInvestigation of key interventions for shigellosis outbreak control in China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0095006-
dc.identifier.pmid24736407-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84899702315-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats