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Article: Does rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder exist in psychiatric populations? A clinical and polysomnographic case-control study

TitleDoes rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder exist in psychiatric populations? A clinical and polysomnographic case-control study
Authors
KeywordsCase-control study
Depression
Psychiatric populations
REM sleep behavior disorder
Antidepressants
Issue Date2013
Citation
Sleep Medicine, 2013, v. 14, n. 8, p. 788-794 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has been increasingly reported in patients with psychiatric disorders (pRBD). Although a close association with the usage of psychotropics has been postulated, it remains elusive whether psychotropics are the only causative factor of RBD symptoms in psychiatric populations. Moreover, there is limited literature documenting and quantifying the clinical and polysomnographic features in this population. Methods: A case-control study comparing the clinical and polysomnographic features of 31 pRBD patients with: (1) Age-, sex-, and psychiatric diagnoses-matched controls; and (2) Typical idiopathic RBD (tRBD) patients. Results: Despite being prescribed with similar psychotropics, pRBD patients had more dream-enacting behaviors (p<. 0.01), sleep-related injuries (p<. 0.01), and nightmares (p<. 0.01) than the psychiatric controls. pRBD patients were younger with more females, but they had comparable sleep-related injuries to tRBD. Both tRBD and pRBD had more REM-related muscle activity than controls (p<. 0.01) and the effect remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, and use of antidepressants. Conclusions: Our study suggests that pRBD had comparable clinical features and consequences to those of tRBD. The occurrence of RBD symptoms in these patients may be related to a constellation of factors, including individual predisposition, depressive illness, antidepressants, and other clinical factors. Given the association of RBD and neurodegeneration in tRBD, further prospective follow-up of these patients is warranted. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222145
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.339
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.363

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Siu Ping-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shirley Xin-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Joey W Y-
dc.contributor.authorMok, Vincent-
dc.contributor.authorTsoh, Joshua-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Anne-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Mandy Wai Man-
dc.contributor.authorLau, Christine Y K-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jihui-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Venny-
dc.contributor.authorHo, Crover K W-
dc.contributor.authorWing, Yun Kwok-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T06:48:53Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T06:48:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationSleep Medicine, 2013, v. 14, n. 8, p. 788-794-
dc.identifier.issn1389-9457-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222145-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has been increasingly reported in patients with psychiatric disorders (pRBD). Although a close association with the usage of psychotropics has been postulated, it remains elusive whether psychotropics are the only causative factor of RBD symptoms in psychiatric populations. Moreover, there is limited literature documenting and quantifying the clinical and polysomnographic features in this population. Methods: A case-control study comparing the clinical and polysomnographic features of 31 pRBD patients with: (1) Age-, sex-, and psychiatric diagnoses-matched controls; and (2) Typical idiopathic RBD (tRBD) patients. Results: Despite being prescribed with similar psychotropics, pRBD patients had more dream-enacting behaviors (p<. 0.01), sleep-related injuries (p<. 0.01), and nightmares (p<. 0.01) than the psychiatric controls. pRBD patients were younger with more females, but they had comparable sleep-related injuries to tRBD. Both tRBD and pRBD had more REM-related muscle activity than controls (p<. 0.01) and the effect remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, and use of antidepressants. Conclusions: Our study suggests that pRBD had comparable clinical features and consequences to those of tRBD. The occurrence of RBD symptoms in these patients may be related to a constellation of factors, including individual predisposition, depressive illness, antidepressants, and other clinical factors. Given the association of RBD and neurodegeneration in tRBD, further prospective follow-up of these patients is warranted. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep Medicine-
dc.subjectCase-control study-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectPsychiatric populations-
dc.subjectREM sleep behavior disorder-
dc.subjectAntidepressants-
dc.titleDoes rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder exist in psychiatric populations? A clinical and polysomnographic case-control study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.sleep.2012.05.016-
dc.identifier.pmid22841026-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84881551686-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage788-
dc.identifier.epage794-
dc.identifier.eissn1878-5506-

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