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Article: Amelioration of obstructive sleep apnea in REM sleep behavior disorder: Implications for the neuromuscular control of OSA

TitleAmelioration of obstructive sleep apnea in REM sleep behavior disorder: Implications for the neuromuscular control of OSA
Authors
KeywordsREM sleep behavior disorder
REM-related EMG activity
Obstructive sleep apnea
Issue Date2011
Citation
Sleep, 2011, v. 34, n. 7, p. 909-915 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The relationship between REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) remains unclear. We aimed to (1) explore the association of REM-related EMG activity (REMREEA) with OSA in RBD patients; (2) compare the severity of OSA between RBD patients with OSA (RBD-OSA) and their age-, sex-, AHI-, and BMI- matched OSA controls. Design: a. Correlation study in consecutive RBD subjects and b. case-control study Setting: Sleep laboratory Participants: 71 RBD patients in the correlation study and 55 subjects (28 RBD-OSA cases and 27 OSA controls) in the case-control study. Intervention: N/A Methods: Polysomnographic assessment to document the sleep architecture, sleep apnea related parameters, and REMREEA. Results: (1) In the correlation study, increased REMREEA was associated with lower severity of OSA in RBD patients, including total AHI (r = -0.263), NREM AHI (r = -0.242), obstructive AHI (r = -0.265), and mean apnea duration (r = -0.353) (P < 0.05). (2) In the case-control study, RBD-OSA patients had lesser severity of sleep apnea parameters than OSA controls in terms of higher nadir SpO2 (85.7% ± 4.9% vs 80.8% ± 5.9%, P < 0.01), shorter maximum hypopnea duration (53.8 ± 16.7 vs 69.4 ± 22.4 seconds, P < 0.05), and maximum (45.8 ± 20.5 vs 60.8 ± 19.6 sec, P < 0.01) and mean apnea duration (22.3 ± 8.1 vs 26.3 ± 5.8 sec, P < 0.05). Significant interaction effects indicated that the usual REM sleep exacerbation of sleep apneas was seen only in OSA controls but not in RBD subjects. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that excessive EMG activity in RBD might protect patients against severe OSA and suggests this may be a naturalistic model for understanding neuromuscular control of OSA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222112
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Jixiong-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jihui-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Siu Ping-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shirley Xin-
dc.contributor.authorHo, Crover Kwok Wah-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Venny-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Mandy Wai Man-
dc.contributor.authorWing, Yun Kwok-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T06:48:00Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T06:48:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationSleep, 2011, v. 34, n. 7, p. 909-915-
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/222112-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The relationship between REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) remains unclear. We aimed to (1) explore the association of REM-related EMG activity (REMREEA) with OSA in RBD patients; (2) compare the severity of OSA between RBD patients with OSA (RBD-OSA) and their age-, sex-, AHI-, and BMI- matched OSA controls. Design: a. Correlation study in consecutive RBD subjects and b. case-control study Setting: Sleep laboratory Participants: 71 RBD patients in the correlation study and 55 subjects (28 RBD-OSA cases and 27 OSA controls) in the case-control study. Intervention: N/A Methods: Polysomnographic assessment to document the sleep architecture, sleep apnea related parameters, and REMREEA. Results: (1) In the correlation study, increased REMREEA was associated with lower severity of OSA in RBD patients, including total AHI (r = -0.263), NREM AHI (r = -0.242), obstructive AHI (r = -0.265), and mean apnea duration (r = -0.353) (P < 0.05). (2) In the case-control study, RBD-OSA patients had lesser severity of sleep apnea parameters than OSA controls in terms of higher nadir SpO2 (85.7% ± 4.9% vs 80.8% ± 5.9%, P < 0.01), shorter maximum hypopnea duration (53.8 ± 16.7 vs 69.4 ± 22.4 seconds, P < 0.05), and maximum (45.8 ± 20.5 vs 60.8 ± 19.6 sec, P < 0.01) and mean apnea duration (22.3 ± 8.1 vs 26.3 ± 5.8 sec, P < 0.05). Significant interaction effects indicated that the usual REM sleep exacerbation of sleep apneas was seen only in OSA controls but not in RBD subjects. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that excessive EMG activity in RBD might protect patients against severe OSA and suggests this may be a naturalistic model for understanding neuromuscular control of OSA.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep-
dc.subjectREM sleep behavior disorder-
dc.subjectREM-related EMG activity-
dc.subjectObstructive sleep apnea-
dc.titleAmelioration of obstructive sleep apnea in REM sleep behavior disorder: Implications for the neuromuscular control of OSA-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.5665/SLEEP.1126-
dc.identifier.pmid21731141-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959947280-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage909-
dc.identifier.epage915-
dc.identifier.eissn1550-9109-

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