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Article: Epidemiological and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Viruses in Malaysia, 2012-2014

TitleEpidemiological and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Viruses in Malaysia, 2012-2014
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2015, v. 10 n. 8, p. e0136254 How to Cite?
AbstractEpidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza B Victoria and Yamagata lineages remained poorly understood in the tropical Southeast Asia region, despite causing seasonal outbreaks worldwide. From 2012-2014, nasopharyngeal swab samples collected from outpatients experiencing acute upper respiratory tract infection symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were screened for influenza viruses using a multiplex RT-PCR assay. Among 2,010/3,935 (51.1%) patients infected with at least one respiratory virus, 287 (14.3%) and 183 (9.1%) samples were tested positive for influenza A and B viruses, respectively. Influenza-positive cases correlate significantly with meteorological factors-total amount of rainfall, relative humidity, number of rain days, ground temperature and particulate matter (PM10). Phylogenetic reconstruction of haemagglutinin (HA) gene from 168 influenza B viruses grouped them into Yamagata Clade 3 (65, 38.7%), Yamagata Clade 2 (48, 28.6%) and Victoria Clade 1 (55, 32.7%). With neuraminidase (NA) phylogeny, 30 intra-clade (29 within Yamagata Clade 3, 1 within Victoria Clade 1) and 1 inter-clade (Yamagata Clade 2-HA/Yamagata Clade 3-NA) reassortants were identified. Study of virus temporal dynamics revealed a lineage shift from Victoria to Yamagata (2012-2013), and a clade shift from Yamagata Clade 2 to Clade 3 (2013-2014). Yamagata Clade 3 predominating in 2014 consisted of intra-clade reassortants that were closely related to a recent WHO vaccine candidate strain (B/Phuket/3073/2013), with the reassortment event occurred approximately 2 years ago based on Bayesian molecular clock estimation. Malaysian Victoria Clade 1 viruses carried H274Y substitution in the active site of neuraminidase, which confers resistance to oseltamivir. Statistical analyses on clinical and demographic data showed Yamagata-infected patients were older and more likely to experience headache while Victoria-infected patients were more likely to experience nasal congestion and sore throat. This study describes the evolution of influenza B viruses in Malaysia and highlights the importance of continuous surveillance for better vaccination policy in this region.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221976
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOong, XY-
dc.contributor.authorNg, KT-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TY-
dc.contributor.authorPang, YK-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KG-
dc.contributor.authorHanafi, NS-
dc.contributor.authorKamarulzaman, A-
dc.contributor.authorTee, KK-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T05:50:38Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-21T05:50:38Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2015, v. 10 n. 8, p. e0136254-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221976-
dc.description.abstractEpidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza B Victoria and Yamagata lineages remained poorly understood in the tropical Southeast Asia region, despite causing seasonal outbreaks worldwide. From 2012-2014, nasopharyngeal swab samples collected from outpatients experiencing acute upper respiratory tract infection symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were screened for influenza viruses using a multiplex RT-PCR assay. Among 2,010/3,935 (51.1%) patients infected with at least one respiratory virus, 287 (14.3%) and 183 (9.1%) samples were tested positive for influenza A and B viruses, respectively. Influenza-positive cases correlate significantly with meteorological factors-total amount of rainfall, relative humidity, number of rain days, ground temperature and particulate matter (PM10). Phylogenetic reconstruction of haemagglutinin (HA) gene from 168 influenza B viruses grouped them into Yamagata Clade 3 (65, 38.7%), Yamagata Clade 2 (48, 28.6%) and Victoria Clade 1 (55, 32.7%). With neuraminidase (NA) phylogeny, 30 intra-clade (29 within Yamagata Clade 3, 1 within Victoria Clade 1) and 1 inter-clade (Yamagata Clade 2-HA/Yamagata Clade 3-NA) reassortants were identified. Study of virus temporal dynamics revealed a lineage shift from Victoria to Yamagata (2012-2013), and a clade shift from Yamagata Clade 2 to Clade 3 (2013-2014). Yamagata Clade 3 predominating in 2014 consisted of intra-clade reassortants that were closely related to a recent WHO vaccine candidate strain (B/Phuket/3073/2013), with the reassortment event occurred approximately 2 years ago based on Bayesian molecular clock estimation. Malaysian Victoria Clade 1 viruses carried H274Y substitution in the active site of neuraminidase, which confers resistance to oseltamivir. Statistical analyses on clinical and demographic data showed Yamagata-infected patients were older and more likely to experience headache while Victoria-infected patients were more likely to experience nasal congestion and sore throat. This study describes the evolution of influenza B viruses in Malaysia and highlights the importance of continuous surveillance for better vaccination policy in this region.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleEpidemiological and Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza B Viruses in Malaysia, 2012-2014-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TY: ttylam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TY=rp01733-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0136254-
dc.identifier.pmid26313754-
dc.identifier.hkuros256523-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.spagee0136254-
dc.identifier.epagee0136254-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000360144000051-

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