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Conference Paper: An investigation of the interaction between concurrent motor output and complex decision-making

TitleAn investigation of the interaction between concurrent motor output and complex decision-making
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.asp
Citation
The 28th International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, China, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39 n. 5-6, p. 128, abstract no. 2020.1 How to Cite?
AbstractSuccessful human performance relies on effective decision-making and efficient motor output, but the need to make a complex decision and an effective movement concurrently can disrupt performance. Take, for example, a police officer drawing and aiming his pistol while simultaneously making a complex decision regarding whether to fire. This study examined whether decision making is more effective when the accompanying motor behaviour has been learned implicitly as opposed to explicitly, so bypassing the need to use working memory, which is a vital mechanism in decision making processes. Preliminary data indicate that performance is superior when the motor act is learned implicitly.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221717
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.276
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.552
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMasters, R-
dc.contributor.authorRaab, M-
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, J-
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, J-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-07T09:11:11Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-07T09:11:11Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationThe 28th International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, China, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39 n. 5-6, p. 128, abstract no. 2020.1-
dc.identifier.issn0020-7594-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221717-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful human performance relies on effective decision-making and efficient motor output, but the need to make a complex decision and an effective movement concurrently can disrupt performance. Take, for example, a police officer drawing and aiming his pistol while simultaneously making a complex decision regarding whether to fire. This study examined whether decision making is more effective when the accompanying motor behaviour has been learned implicitly as opposed to explicitly, so bypassing the need to use working memory, which is a vital mechanism in decision making processes. Preliminary data indicate that performance is superior when the motor act is learned implicitly.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Psychology-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Psychology. Copyright © Psychology Press.-
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.-
dc.titleAn investigation of the interaction between concurrent motor output and complex decision-making-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailMasters, R: mastersr@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMaxwell, J: maxwellj@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, J: jamiep@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, R=rp00935-
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, J=rp00949-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207594.2004.20040810-
dc.identifier.hkuros101659-
dc.identifier.volume39-
dc.identifier.issue5-6-
dc.identifier.spage128, abstract no. 2020.1-
dc.identifier.epage128, abstract no. 2020.1-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.relation.projectAn investigation of the influence of implicit and explicit modes of learning on the interaction between decision making and motor output in human performance-

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