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Article: The diagnostic accuracy of a new test of early nonword repetition for differentiating late talking and typically developing children

TitleThe diagnostic accuracy of a new test of early nonword repetition for differentiating late talking and typically developing children
Authors
KeywordsLate talkers
Language impairment
Diagnostic accuracy
Sensitivity and specificity
Nonword repetition
Issue Date2009
Citation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2009, v. 52, n. 4, p. 872-882 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of a new Test of Early Nonword Repetition (TENR) for 2-year-old children. Method: 232 British-English-speaking children aged 27 (±3) months were assessed on 3 standardized tests (receptive and expressive vocabulary and visual processing) and a novel nonword repetition (NWR) test. Parents completed a British adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory: Words and Sentences (CDI:WS-UK; Klee & Harrison, 2001). The diagnostic accuracy of two versions (1-3 syllables and 1-4 syllables) of a new NWR test was examined. Standard diagnostic accuracy measures of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratios were generated. Results: 177 children (80%) completed the 1-3 syllable task, and 96 children (73%) completed the 1-4 syllable task. The 1-3 syllable version produced a positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 7.8 (confidence interval [CI] = 4.5-13.6) and a negative likelihood ratio (LR-) of .28 (CI = .12-.65). The 1-4 syllable version of the NWR test produced a LR+ of 14.88 (CI = 6.1-36.2) and a LR- of .13 (CI = .02-.83). Conclusion: The TENR could be useful for identifying 2-year-old children at risk of language impairment. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221431
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStokes, SF-
dc.contributor.authorKlee, T-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T03:36:58Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-19T03:36:58Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2009, v. 52, n. 4, p. 872-882-
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221431-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of a new Test of Early Nonword Repetition (TENR) for 2-year-old children. Method: 232 British-English-speaking children aged 27 (±3) months were assessed on 3 standardized tests (receptive and expressive vocabulary and visual processing) and a novel nonword repetition (NWR) test. Parents completed a British adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory: Words and Sentences (CDI:WS-UK; Klee & Harrison, 2001). The diagnostic accuracy of two versions (1-3 syllables and 1-4 syllables) of a new NWR test was examined. Standard diagnostic accuracy measures of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratios were generated. Results: 177 children (80%) completed the 1-3 syllable task, and 96 children (73%) completed the 1-4 syllable task. The 1-3 syllable version produced a positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 7.8 (confidence interval [CI] = 4.5-13.6) and a negative likelihood ratio (LR-) of .28 (CI = .12-.65). The 1-4 syllable version of the NWR test produced a LR+ of 14.88 (CI = 6.1-36.2) and a LR- of .13 (CI = .02-.83). Conclusion: The TENR could be useful for identifying 2-year-old children at risk of language impairment. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research-
dc.subjectLate talkers-
dc.subjectLanguage impairment-
dc.subjectDiagnostic accuracy-
dc.subjectSensitivity and specificity-
dc.subjectNonword repetition-
dc.titleThe diagnostic accuracy of a new test of early nonword repetition for differentiating late talking and typically developing children-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0030)-
dc.identifier.pmid19641075-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68149092104-
dc.identifier.volume52-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage872-
dc.identifier.epage882-

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