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Article: Differences in family characteristics parenting behavior in families with language-delayed language-normal toddlers

TitleDifferences in family characteristics parenting behavior in families with language-delayed language-normal toddlers
Authors
Issue Date1999
Citation
Infant-Toddler Intervention, 1999, v. 9, n. 3, p. 259-279 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study compared parental perceptions of 64 children who at 2 years of age were categorized into two comparison groups. The first grouping strategy separated those who screened positive ('fail') and negative ('pass') on the Language Development Survey (LDS) (Rescorla, 1989). The second grouping strategy categorized the subjects into either the language delayed (LD) or language normal (LN) classification according to results from a full clinical evaluation. As a further comparison, 26 families participated in reassessment procedures when the children were 5 to 6 years old. Differences between parental perceptions using these two groupings were found on a number of parenting and family variables. Mothers of toddlers who were LDS positive or LD reported themselves and their spouses as being less nurturant than those with toddlers who were LDS negative or LN. Fathers of LDS positive or LD toddlers rated themselves as being less oriented toward independence training of the child. Further, families with LDS positive or LD toddlers were rated by mothers as being less sociable and were more emeshed (e,g., family members have few personal freedoms) and oriented toward external locus of control (e.g., parents believe that they have little control over their daily lives). Moreover, according to maternal report data, some parenting behaviors showed some degree of consistency as found during reassessment when the subjects were 5 to 6 years oldmost notably in terms of nurturant behavior toward the child. The findings support the notion that parent education and involvement is a critical aspect of any language-based intervention with young children.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221413
ISSN
2004 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.134

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarson, DK-
dc.contributor.authorPerry, CK-
dc.contributor.authorDiefenderfer, A-
dc.contributor.authorKlee, T-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T03:36:55Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-19T03:36:55Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.citationInfant-Toddler Intervention, 1999, v. 9, n. 3, p. 259-279-
dc.identifier.issn1053-5586-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221413-
dc.description.abstractThis study compared parental perceptions of 64 children who at 2 years of age were categorized into two comparison groups. The first grouping strategy separated those who screened positive ('fail') and negative ('pass') on the Language Development Survey (LDS) (Rescorla, 1989). The second grouping strategy categorized the subjects into either the language delayed (LD) or language normal (LN) classification according to results from a full clinical evaluation. As a further comparison, 26 families participated in reassessment procedures when the children were 5 to 6 years old. Differences between parental perceptions using these two groupings were found on a number of parenting and family variables. Mothers of toddlers who were LDS positive or LD reported themselves and their spouses as being less nurturant than those with toddlers who were LDS negative or LN. Fathers of LDS positive or LD toddlers rated themselves as being less oriented toward independence training of the child. Further, families with LDS positive or LD toddlers were rated by mothers as being less sociable and were more emeshed (e,g., family members have few personal freedoms) and oriented toward external locus of control (e.g., parents believe that they have little control over their daily lives). Moreover, according to maternal report data, some parenting behaviors showed some degree of consistency as found during reassessment when the subjects were 5 to 6 years oldmost notably in terms of nurturant behavior toward the child. The findings support the notion that parent education and involvement is a critical aspect of any language-based intervention with young children.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInfant-Toddler Intervention-
dc.titleDifferences in family characteristics parenting behavior in families with language-delayed language-normal toddlers-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032857023-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage259-
dc.identifier.epage279-

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