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Article: Children's language proficiency at ages 2 and 3 as predictors of behavior problems, social and cognitive development at age 3

TitleChildren's language proficiency at ages 2 and 3 as predictors of behavior problems, social and cognitive development at age 3
Authors
Issue Date1998
Citation
Communication Disorders Quarterly, 1998, v. 19, n. 2, p. 21-30 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the relationship between language proficiency, behavior problems, and other areas of development in a sample of 36 children ranging from 36-40 months (M = 37.3; SD = 1.1). Although none of the children were in the clinical range of behavioral disturbance, the findings indicated a strong general association between deficiencies in both expressive and receptive language and children's behavioral difficulties. Specifically, deficits in expressive language at age 2 (M = 25.5 mo.; SD = 0.6 mo.) were more predictive of internalizing rather than externalizing behavior problems at age 3, including symptoms associated with anxiety and depression, withdrawal, sleep and somatic problems. However, deficits in receptive language at age 3 were more predictive of these same types of symptoms at age 3, along with more destructive kinds of behaviors. Scores on measures of receptive language abilities at age 2 were positively predictive of social and cognitive development at age 3. These findings indicate a need for early identification of language delays in young children to help prevent deficits in language that might be linked to behavior problems or delays in other areas of development. Further, our results suggest the need for early intervention, especially for children who display both language delays and behavioral difficulties. © 1998 The Division for Children's Communication Development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221397
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.335

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarson, DK-
dc.contributor.authorKlee, T-
dc.contributor.authorLee, S-
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, KC-
dc.contributor.authorPerry, CK-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T03:36:52Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-19T03:36:52Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationCommunication Disorders Quarterly, 1998, v. 19, n. 2, p. 21-30-
dc.identifier.issn1525-7401-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221397-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between language proficiency, behavior problems, and other areas of development in a sample of 36 children ranging from 36-40 months (M = 37.3; SD = 1.1). Although none of the children were in the clinical range of behavioral disturbance, the findings indicated a strong general association between deficiencies in both expressive and receptive language and children's behavioral difficulties. Specifically, deficits in expressive language at age 2 (M = 25.5 mo.; SD = 0.6 mo.) were more predictive of internalizing rather than externalizing behavior problems at age 3, including symptoms associated with anxiety and depression, withdrawal, sleep and somatic problems. However, deficits in receptive language at age 3 were more predictive of these same types of symptoms at age 3, along with more destructive kinds of behaviors. Scores on measures of receptive language abilities at age 2 were positively predictive of social and cognitive development at age 3. These findings indicate a need for early identification of language delays in young children to help prevent deficits in language that might be linked to behavior problems or delays in other areas of development. Further, our results suggest the need for early intervention, especially for children who display both language delays and behavioral difficulties. © 1998 The Division for Children's Communication Development.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCommunication Disorders Quarterly-
dc.titleChildren's language proficiency at ages 2 and 3 as predictors of behavior problems, social and cognitive development at age 3-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/152574019801900203-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0002070392-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage21-
dc.identifier.epage30-
dc.identifier.eissn1538-4837-

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