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Article: Defining an optimal surgical strategy for synchronous colorectal liver metastases: Staged versus simultaneous resection?

TitleDefining an optimal surgical strategy for synchronous colorectal liver metastases: Staged versus simultaneous resection?
Authors
KeywordsStage resection
Simultaneous resection
Synchronous colorectal liver metastasis
Issue Date2015
Citation
ANZ Journal of Surgery, 2015, v. 85, n. 11, p. 829-833 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Background: We aimed to assess if simultaneous resection conferred any survival benefit in resection of synchronous colorectal liver metastases. Methods: From January 1990 to December 2008, 116 patients with synchronous colorectal liver metastases were identified. Among these 116 patients, 88 underwent staged resection (SR), while the remaining 28 patients underwent simultaneous resection (SIMR). Patients' follow-up data were reviewed. Results: There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of patient and tumour characteristics. Major hepatectomy was performed in 54 patients (61%) undergoing SR, and 12 patients (43%) undergoing SIMR (P = 0.09). The median blood loss (SR 0.7L versus SIMR 0.8L) was similar. Post-operative morbidity rates and hospital mortality rates were not statistically different. The total length of hospital stay was shorter in SIMR patients (18.0 versus 11.5 days, P = 0.009). The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival for SR were 90.7%, 47.1% and 33.3%, whilst the corresponding survival rates for SIMR were 75.0%, 25.0% and 0%, respectively (P = 0.003). However, when the disease-free survival (DFS) was stratified according to the number of hepatic metastases, the survival benefit of SR and SIMR for solitary CRM were similar (3-year DFS: 28.3% versus 11.1%, P = 0.089). Conclusions: Our study showed that an operative strategy of SR generally offered better survival outcome than SIMR in the surgical management of CRM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221394
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.158
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.432

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShe, WH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, ACY-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, RTP-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TT-
dc.contributor.authorChok, KSH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SC-
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-18T06:09:12Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-18T06:09:12Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationANZ Journal of Surgery, 2015, v. 85, n. 11, p. 829-833-
dc.identifier.issn1445-1433-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221394-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Background: We aimed to assess if simultaneous resection conferred any survival benefit in resection of synchronous colorectal liver metastases. Methods: From January 1990 to December 2008, 116 patients with synchronous colorectal liver metastases were identified. Among these 116 patients, 88 underwent staged resection (SR), while the remaining 28 patients underwent simultaneous resection (SIMR). Patients' follow-up data were reviewed. Results: There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of patient and tumour characteristics. Major hepatectomy was performed in 54 patients (61%) undergoing SR, and 12 patients (43%) undergoing SIMR (P = 0.09). The median blood loss (SR 0.7L versus SIMR 0.8L) was similar. Post-operative morbidity rates and hospital mortality rates were not statistically different. The total length of hospital stay was shorter in SIMR patients (18.0 versus 11.5 days, P = 0.009). The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival for SR were 90.7%, 47.1% and 33.3%, whilst the corresponding survival rates for SIMR were 75.0%, 25.0% and 0%, respectively (P = 0.003). However, when the disease-free survival (DFS) was stratified according to the number of hepatic metastases, the survival benefit of SR and SIMR for solitary CRM were similar (3-year DFS: 28.3% versus 11.1%, P = 0.089). Conclusions: Our study showed that an operative strategy of SR generally offered better survival outcome than SIMR in the surgical management of CRM.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofANZ Journal of Surgery-
dc.subjectStage resection-
dc.subjectSimultaneous resection-
dc.subjectSynchronous colorectal liver metastasis-
dc.titleDefining an optimal surgical strategy for synchronous colorectal liver metastases: Staged versus simultaneous resection?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ans.12739-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84945143743-
dc.identifier.hkuros233263-
dc.identifier.volume85-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage829-
dc.identifier.epage833-
dc.identifier.eissn1445-2197-

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