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Article: Retrospective study of metachronous lung metastases from primary hepatocellular carcinoma

TitleRetrospective study of metachronous lung metastases from primary hepatocellular carcinoma
Authors
KeywordsOutcome
Segmentectomy
Wedge resection
Liver
Lobectomy
Issue Date2014
Citation
ANZ Journal of Surgery, 2014 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Background: This study investigates whether there has been any survival improvement for hepatocellular carcinoma patients with resectable and unresectable lung metastases over time. Methods: The data of 280 hepatocellular carcinoma patients who developed metachronous lung metastases after hepatectomy with curative intent were analysed. Overall survival was compared in patients with resectable and unresectable lung metastases and in different periods (Era I: 1989-1995, Era II: 1996-2010). Results: The median overall survival of patients with unresectable and resectable diseases was 7.46 and 40.36 months, respectively (P < 0.0001). In Era I, the median overall survival of patients with unresectable and resectable diseases was 5.59 and 43.15 months, respectively (P < 0.0001). The corresponding figures in Era II were 8.38 and 32.90 months (P < 0.0001). The overall survival of patients with resectable disease did not differ significantly in the two eras but there was a significant improvement in survival of patients with unresectable disease in Era II. Their 1-year, 3-year and 5-year survival rates in Era I versus Era II were 11.1% versus 38.4%, 5.6% versus 9.1% and 2.8% versus 3.5%, respectively (P = 0.041). The corresponding figures for their counterparts in the resectable group were 90% versus 85.8%, 80% versus 45.9% and 40% versus 29.5%, respectively (P = 0.443). Conclusions: Patients with resectable lung metastases had better overall survival than those with unresectable lung metastases. Notably, patients with unresectable lung metastases had significant improvement in survival over the years.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221372
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.158
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.432

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChok, KSH-
dc.contributor.authorYau, TCC-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TT-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, RTP-
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-18T06:09:08Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-18T06:09:08Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationANZ Journal of Surgery, 2014-
dc.identifier.issn1445-1433-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221372-
dc.description.abstract© 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Background: This study investigates whether there has been any survival improvement for hepatocellular carcinoma patients with resectable and unresectable lung metastases over time. Methods: The data of 280 hepatocellular carcinoma patients who developed metachronous lung metastases after hepatectomy with curative intent were analysed. Overall survival was compared in patients with resectable and unresectable lung metastases and in different periods (Era I: 1989-1995, Era II: 1996-2010). Results: The median overall survival of patients with unresectable and resectable diseases was 7.46 and 40.36 months, respectively (P < 0.0001). In Era I, the median overall survival of patients with unresectable and resectable diseases was 5.59 and 43.15 months, respectively (P < 0.0001). The corresponding figures in Era II were 8.38 and 32.90 months (P < 0.0001). The overall survival of patients with resectable disease did not differ significantly in the two eras but there was a significant improvement in survival of patients with unresectable disease in Era II. Their 1-year, 3-year and 5-year survival rates in Era I versus Era II were 11.1% versus 38.4%, 5.6% versus 9.1% and 2.8% versus 3.5%, respectively (P = 0.041). The corresponding figures for their counterparts in the resectable group were 90% versus 85.8%, 80% versus 45.9% and 40% versus 29.5%, respectively (P = 0.443). Conclusions: Patients with resectable lung metastases had better overall survival than those with unresectable lung metastases. Notably, patients with unresectable lung metastases had significant improvement in survival over the years.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofANZ Journal of Surgery-
dc.subjectOutcome-
dc.subjectSegmentectomy-
dc.subjectWedge resection-
dc.subjectLiver-
dc.subjectLobectomy-
dc.titleRetrospective study of metachronous lung metastases from primary hepatocellular carcinoma-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ans.12859-
dc.identifier.pmid25267256-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84908409804-
dc.identifier.hkuros241977-
dc.identifier.hkuros239995-
dc.identifier.eissn1445-2197-

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