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Article: Survival outcome of re-resection for recurrent liver metastases of colorectal cancer: A retrospective study

TitleSurvival outcome of re-resection for recurrent liver metastases of colorectal cancer: A retrospective study
Authors
KeywordsColorectal cancer
Recurrence
Liver metastasis
Survival
Resection
Issue Date2014
Citation
ANZ Journal of Surgery, 2014, v. 84, n. 7-8, p. 545-549 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: This study aimed to investigate whether re-resection can achieve a good survival outcome in the treatment of recurrent liver metastases of colorectal cancer. Methods: Prospectively collected data of patients who underwent hepatectomy for liver tumours were reviewed. Patients whose liver tumours were metastases of colorectal cancer were included in the study provided that they had no extrahepatic metastases and received no loco-ablative treatment simultaneous with hepatectomy. Patients who did not have recurrent liver metastasis after their first liver resection (group R) and patients who underwent re-resection for recurrent liver metastasis (group RR) were compared. Results: In total, 321 patients were included in the study, with 307 in group R and 14 in group RR. The two groups had comparable demographics. Insignificantly more patients in group R received major resection (55.6% versus 30.8%, P = 0.079). The median blood loss volume was 0.6 (0-12.7) L in group R and 0.35 (0-15) L in group RR (P = 0.202). Group RR had a significantly smaller median tumour size (2.5 cm versus 3.5cm, P = 0.020) and resection margin width (0.3 cm versus 0.7cm, P = 0.037). On univariate analysis, re-resection was not a risk factor in overall survival. On multivariate analysis, post-operative complication (hazard ratio (HR) 1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.39, P = 0.007), microscopic margin involvement (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.26-3.04, P = 0.003) and multiple tumours (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.17-2.14, P = 0.003) were risk factors in overall survival. The two groups had no significant differences in disease-free survival and overall survival. Conclusion: Re-resection for recurrent colorectal liver metastases can achieve a favourable survival outcome at centres with expertise. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221370
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.158
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.432
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChok, KSH-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TT-
dc.contributor.authorChan, ACY-
dc.contributor.authorDai, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SC-
dc.contributor.authorFan, ST-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, RTP-
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-18T06:09:08Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-18T06:09:08Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationANZ Journal of Surgery, 2014, v. 84, n. 7-8, p. 545-549-
dc.identifier.issn1445-1433-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221370-
dc.description.abstractBackground: This study aimed to investigate whether re-resection can achieve a good survival outcome in the treatment of recurrent liver metastases of colorectal cancer. Methods: Prospectively collected data of patients who underwent hepatectomy for liver tumours were reviewed. Patients whose liver tumours were metastases of colorectal cancer were included in the study provided that they had no extrahepatic metastases and received no loco-ablative treatment simultaneous with hepatectomy. Patients who did not have recurrent liver metastasis after their first liver resection (group R) and patients who underwent re-resection for recurrent liver metastasis (group RR) were compared. Results: In total, 321 patients were included in the study, with 307 in group R and 14 in group RR. The two groups had comparable demographics. Insignificantly more patients in group R received major resection (55.6% versus 30.8%, P = 0.079). The median blood loss volume was 0.6 (0-12.7) L in group R and 0.35 (0-15) L in group RR (P = 0.202). Group RR had a significantly smaller median tumour size (2.5 cm versus 3.5cm, P = 0.020) and resection margin width (0.3 cm versus 0.7cm, P = 0.037). On univariate analysis, re-resection was not a risk factor in overall survival. On multivariate analysis, post-operative complication (hazard ratio (HR) 1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-2.39, P = 0.007), microscopic margin involvement (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.26-3.04, P = 0.003) and multiple tumours (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.17-2.14, P = 0.003) were risk factors in overall survival. The two groups had no significant differences in disease-free survival and overall survival. Conclusion: Re-resection for recurrent colorectal liver metastases can achieve a favourable survival outcome at centres with expertise. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofANZ Journal of Surgery-
dc.subjectColorectal cancer-
dc.subjectRecurrence-
dc.subjectLiver metastasis-
dc.subjectSurvival-
dc.subjectResection-
dc.titleSurvival outcome of re-resection for recurrent liver metastases of colorectal cancer: A retrospective study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ans.12298-
dc.identifier.pmid23809019-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84905022024-
dc.identifier.hkuros220022-
dc.identifier.volume84-
dc.identifier.issue7-8-
dc.identifier.spage545-
dc.identifier.epage549-
dc.identifier.eissn1445-2197-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000340237100013-

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