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Article: A retrospective study on risk factors associated with failed endoscopic treatment of biliary anastomotic stricture after right-lobe living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis

TitleA retrospective study on risk factors associated with failed endoscopic treatment of biliary anastomotic stricture after right-lobe living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis
Authors
KeywordsLDLT
ERC
liver transplant
PTBD
Biliary stricture
Issue Date2014
Citation
Annals of Surgery, 2014, v. 259, n. 4, p. 767-772 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE:: This aim of this study is to determine the risk factors in failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). BACKGROUND:: Endoscopic treatment is considered the first-line intervention for biliary anastomotic stricture (BAS) after right-lobe living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis. METHODS:: A retrospective study was performed on 287 patients who received right-lobe living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis. The morphology of BAS was defined according to the shape of the distal side of duct-to-duct anastomosis shown on cholangiogram and was categorized into 3 types: pouched, intermediately pouched, and triangular. All cases of ERC were performed by operating surgeons. RESULTS:: Fifty-nine patients (20.6%) had BAS and received ERC and balloon dilatation with or without stenting. The success rate was 73.2%. The median number of sessions needed for successful ERC was 3. In the 15 patients with failed ERC, 4 were successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and balloon dilatation and 11 underwent conversion hepaticojejunostomy (6 had external percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage as a temporizing measure). On multivariate analysis, recipient age [odds ratio (OR): 0.922; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85-1.00; P = 0.049], operation time (OR: 1.007; 95% CI: 1.001-1.013; P = 0.025), and morphology of stricture (OR: 6.722; 95% CI: 1.31-34.48; P = 0.022) were independent risk factors associated with failed ERC. The success rates for the 3 types of BAS - pouched, intermediately pouched, and triangular - were 42.9%, 63.6%, and 88.9%, respectively (P = 0.021). Association was found between bile leak and pouched BAS (P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS:: ERC is highly effective in treating BAS. A success rate of 73%, the highest ever reported, has been achieved. Morphology of stricture is associated with outcome of ERC. Radiological or surgical intervention should be considered for patients with pouched BAS after endoscopic treatment fails for the first time. © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221357
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.569
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.503
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChok, KSH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SC-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TT-
dc.contributor.authorSharr, WW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, ACY-
dc.contributor.authorFan, ST-
dc.contributor.authorLo, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-18T06:09:05Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-18T06:09:05Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of Surgery, 2014, v. 259, n. 4, p. 767-772-
dc.identifier.issn0003-4932-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221357-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE:: This aim of this study is to determine the risk factors in failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). BACKGROUND:: Endoscopic treatment is considered the first-line intervention for biliary anastomotic stricture (BAS) after right-lobe living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis. METHODS:: A retrospective study was performed on 287 patients who received right-lobe living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis. The morphology of BAS was defined according to the shape of the distal side of duct-to-duct anastomosis shown on cholangiogram and was categorized into 3 types: pouched, intermediately pouched, and triangular. All cases of ERC were performed by operating surgeons. RESULTS:: Fifty-nine patients (20.6%) had BAS and received ERC and balloon dilatation with or without stenting. The success rate was 73.2%. The median number of sessions needed for successful ERC was 3. In the 15 patients with failed ERC, 4 were successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and balloon dilatation and 11 underwent conversion hepaticojejunostomy (6 had external percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage as a temporizing measure). On multivariate analysis, recipient age [odds ratio (OR): 0.922; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85-1.00; P = 0.049], operation time (OR: 1.007; 95% CI: 1.001-1.013; P = 0.025), and morphology of stricture (OR: 6.722; 95% CI: 1.31-34.48; P = 0.022) were independent risk factors associated with failed ERC. The success rates for the 3 types of BAS - pouched, intermediately pouched, and triangular - were 42.9%, 63.6%, and 88.9%, respectively (P = 0.021). Association was found between bile leak and pouched BAS (P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS:: ERC is highly effective in treating BAS. A success rate of 73%, the highest ever reported, has been achieved. Morphology of stricture is associated with outcome of ERC. Radiological or surgical intervention should be considered for patients with pouched BAS after endoscopic treatment fails for the first time. © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Surgery-
dc.subjectLDLT-
dc.subjectERC-
dc.subjectliver transplant-
dc.subjectPTBD-
dc.subjectBiliary stricture-
dc.titleA retrospective study on risk factors associated with failed endoscopic treatment of biliary anastomotic stricture after right-lobe living donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/SLA.0b013e318294d0ce-
dc.identifier.pmid23657086-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84895924904-
dc.identifier.hkuros220119-
dc.identifier.volume259-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage767-
dc.identifier.epage772-
dc.identifier.eissn1528-1140-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000336247400040-

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