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postgraduate thesis: Adaptive reuse of heritage buildings in Hong Kong : a case study of Wing Lee Street and Lui Seng Chun

TitleAdaptive reuse of heritage buildings in Hong Kong : a case study of Wing Lee Street and Lui Seng Chun
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Wang, X. [王雪]. (2015). Adaptive reuse of heritage buildings in Hong Kong : a case study of Wing Lee Street and Lui Seng Chun. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5611896
AbstractThe conservation approach of “adaptive reuse”, as a means to give new life to deteriorated heritage buildings, seems to receive criticism from people of Hong Kong in recent years. While the government tries to promote this conservation treatment to seek a balance between sustainable development and heritage conservation, the residents unsatisfied with the conservation results; and carrying a sense of criticism on government’s too much intervention. Studies in recent years indicated different preference on “what to conserve” then a series of adaptive reuse potential model was constructed. However, there is limited research comparing different opinions on “how to conserve” and investigating the adaptive reuse outcomes of current projects in a comprehensive way. Hong Kong is a dynamic, contemporary city with short history. Relics in Hong Kong were often torn down once the economic returns of redevelopment much higher. Besides this, the limitation of resources both land and labor let the heritage buildings face the risks of demolition and redevelopment. “Change or continuity” and “reuse or demolition” have form the central argument for heritage conservation in Hong Kong. This dissertation uses the adaptive reuse of Wing Lee Street and Lui Seng Chun as a study case. Wing Lee Street is a completely government initiated project, while Lui Seng Chun is a product of government and non-government cooperation. Both cases possessing Hong Kong housing identity while sharing the same target, benefit community. Wing Lee Street took the compatible reuse approach while Lui Seng Chun adopted the appropriate reuse approach. Due to different reuse approach plus different stakeholders’ involvement, the reuse outcomes are totally different. The original target of Lui Seng Chun has been successfully met while Wing Lee Street failed to meet the reuse objective. After a detailed analysis, the thesis found that, convert old buildings to new uses is a better strategy than demolish and a scheme that allow non-government to apply for will bring a win-win situation. Learn from Lui Seng Chun, in order to bring vibrant to the street, the thesis suggests that Wing Lee Street should either go back to private ownership or maintaining the original inhabitants and tenants. On the other hand, there are also some recommendations for future adaptive reuse projects in Hong Kong: towards a collaborative partnership between different groups of people; incentives to enhance the economic viability of the use uses; and the heritage building conservation plan should accompanied by a long-term building management plan. In the nutshell, adaptive reuse is not about developing mega-events without wholly grounded decision-making or pursuit economic development at the cost of residents’ interests. It is more about engaging with the lives of those people who live in the city. This dissertation contributes to identifying the major factors of the sustainability framework for the adaptive reuse of historic buildings. Hope this dissertation will be a useful reference for a better outcome in future heritage building projects in Hong Kong.
DegreeMaster of Housing Management
SubjectHistoric buildings - Remodeling for other use - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramHousing Management
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221259

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xue-
dc.contributor.author王雪-
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-17T23:11:44Z-
dc.date.available2015-11-17T23:11:44Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationWang, X. [王雪]. (2015). Adaptive reuse of heritage buildings in Hong Kong : a case study of Wing Lee Street and Lui Seng Chun. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5611896-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/221259-
dc.description.abstractThe conservation approach of “adaptive reuse”, as a means to give new life to deteriorated heritage buildings, seems to receive criticism from people of Hong Kong in recent years. While the government tries to promote this conservation treatment to seek a balance between sustainable development and heritage conservation, the residents unsatisfied with the conservation results; and carrying a sense of criticism on government’s too much intervention. Studies in recent years indicated different preference on “what to conserve” then a series of adaptive reuse potential model was constructed. However, there is limited research comparing different opinions on “how to conserve” and investigating the adaptive reuse outcomes of current projects in a comprehensive way. Hong Kong is a dynamic, contemporary city with short history. Relics in Hong Kong were often torn down once the economic returns of redevelopment much higher. Besides this, the limitation of resources both land and labor let the heritage buildings face the risks of demolition and redevelopment. “Change or continuity” and “reuse or demolition” have form the central argument for heritage conservation in Hong Kong. This dissertation uses the adaptive reuse of Wing Lee Street and Lui Seng Chun as a study case. Wing Lee Street is a completely government initiated project, while Lui Seng Chun is a product of government and non-government cooperation. Both cases possessing Hong Kong housing identity while sharing the same target, benefit community. Wing Lee Street took the compatible reuse approach while Lui Seng Chun adopted the appropriate reuse approach. Due to different reuse approach plus different stakeholders’ involvement, the reuse outcomes are totally different. The original target of Lui Seng Chun has been successfully met while Wing Lee Street failed to meet the reuse objective. After a detailed analysis, the thesis found that, convert old buildings to new uses is a better strategy than demolish and a scheme that allow non-government to apply for will bring a win-win situation. Learn from Lui Seng Chun, in order to bring vibrant to the street, the thesis suggests that Wing Lee Street should either go back to private ownership or maintaining the original inhabitants and tenants. On the other hand, there are also some recommendations for future adaptive reuse projects in Hong Kong: towards a collaborative partnership between different groups of people; incentives to enhance the economic viability of the use uses; and the heritage building conservation plan should accompanied by a long-term building management plan. In the nutshell, adaptive reuse is not about developing mega-events without wholly grounded decision-making or pursuit economic development at the cost of residents’ interests. It is more about engaging with the lives of those people who live in the city. This dissertation contributes to identifying the major factors of the sustainability framework for the adaptive reuse of historic buildings. Hope this dissertation will be a useful reference for a better outcome in future heritage building projects in Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshHistoric buildings - Remodeling for other use - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleAdaptive reuse of heritage buildings in Hong Kong : a case study of Wing Lee Street and Lui Seng Chun-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5611896-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Housing Management-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineHousing Management-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

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