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Article: Development of a conceptually equivalent Chinese-language translation of the US Household Food Security Survey Module for Chinese immigrants to the USA

TitleDevelopment of a conceptually equivalent Chinese-language translation of the US Household Food Security Survey Module for Chinese immigrants to the USA
Authors
KeywordsMeasurement
Survey
Chinese
Food insecurity
Issue Date2014
Citation
Public Health Nutrition, 2014, v. 18, n. 2, p. 242-250 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014 The Authors. Objective To develop a conceptually equivalent Chinese-language translation of the eighteen-item US Household Food Security Survey Module. Design In the current qualitative study, we (i) highlight methodological challenges which arise in developing survey instruments that will be used to make comparisons across language groups and (ii) describe the development of a Chinese-language translation of the US Household Food Security Survey Module, called the San Francisco Chinese Food Security Module. Setting Community sites in San Francisco, CA, USA. Subjects We conducted cognitive interviews with twenty-two community members recruited from community sites hosting food pantries and with five professionals recruited from clinical settings. Results Development of conceptually equivalent surveys can be difficult. We highlight challenges related to dialect, education, literacy (e.g. preferences for more or less formal phrasing), English words and phrases for which there is no Chinese language equivalent (e.g. 'balanced meals' and 'eat less than you felt you should') and response formats. We selected final translations to maximize: (i) consistency of the Chinese translation with the intent of the English version; (ii) clarity; and (iii) similarities in understanding across dialects and literacy levels. Conclusions Survey translation is essential for conducting research in many communities. The challenges encountered illustrate how literal translations can affect the conceptual equivalence of survey items across languages. Cognitive interview methods should be routinely used for survey translation when such non-equivalence is suspected, such as in surveys addressing highly culturally bound behaviours such as diet and eating behaviours. Literally translated surveys lacking conceptual equivalence may magnify or obscure important health inequalities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220862
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.433
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.995

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwan, Christine M L-
dc.contributor.authorNapoles, Anna M.-
dc.contributor.authorChou, Jeyling-
dc.contributor.authorSeligman, Hilary K.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-22T09:04:39Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-22T09:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health Nutrition, 2014, v. 18, n. 2, p. 242-250-
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220862-
dc.description.abstract© 2014 The Authors. Objective To develop a conceptually equivalent Chinese-language translation of the eighteen-item US Household Food Security Survey Module. Design In the current qualitative study, we (i) highlight methodological challenges which arise in developing survey instruments that will be used to make comparisons across language groups and (ii) describe the development of a Chinese-language translation of the US Household Food Security Survey Module, called the San Francisco Chinese Food Security Module. Setting Community sites in San Francisco, CA, USA. Subjects We conducted cognitive interviews with twenty-two community members recruited from community sites hosting food pantries and with five professionals recruited from clinical settings. Results Development of conceptually equivalent surveys can be difficult. We highlight challenges related to dialect, education, literacy (e.g. preferences for more or less formal phrasing), English words and phrases for which there is no Chinese language equivalent (e.g. 'balanced meals' and 'eat less than you felt you should') and response formats. We selected final translations to maximize: (i) consistency of the Chinese translation with the intent of the English version; (ii) clarity; and (iii) similarities in understanding across dialects and literacy levels. Conclusions Survey translation is essential for conducting research in many communities. The challenges encountered illustrate how literal translations can affect the conceptual equivalence of survey items across languages. Cognitive interview methods should be routinely used for survey translation when such non-equivalence is suspected, such as in surveys addressing highly culturally bound behaviours such as diet and eating behaviours. Literally translated surveys lacking conceptual equivalence may magnify or obscure important health inequalities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPublic Health Nutrition-
dc.subjectMeasurement-
dc.subjectSurvey-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectFood insecurity-
dc.titleDevelopment of a conceptually equivalent Chinese-language translation of the US Household Food Security Survey Module for Chinese immigrants to the USA-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1368980014000160-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84927587835-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage242-
dc.identifier.epage250-
dc.identifier.eissn1475-2727-

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