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Article: Management of tracheobronchial obstruction in infants using metallic stents: long-term outcome

TitleManagement of tracheobronchial obstruction in infants using metallic stents: long-term outcome
Authors
KeywordsSelf-expandable stent
Metallic stent
Tracheal stenosis
Tracheobronchomalacia
Airway obstruction
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00383/index.htm
Citation
Pediatric Surgery International, 2015, v. 31, n. 3, p. 249-254 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Results: Twelve balloon-expandable metallic stents were placed in the trachea (n = 10) and/or bronchi (n = 2) of 5 patients with a median age of 13 months (range 5–30 months). Etiology of the airway obstruction included congenital tracheal stenosis (n = 4), giant cervical and superior mediastinal lymphatic malformation with tracheobronchomalacia (n = 1). Seven complications were reported (3 patients developed granulation tissue, 2 patients had re-stenosis, 1 stent migrated, 1 stent fractured). All patients survived and were in good condition with a median follow-up of 16 years (range 11–18 years). Three patients weaned off ventilator and oxygen. Conclusions: Endoscopic stenting with metallic stent has satisfactory long-term outcome in treating infants with tracheobronchial obstruction. Introduction: Tracheobronchial obstruction, although uncommon in the pediatric age group, remains a challenging problem. We review the long-term outcome of endoscopic metallic stenting in infants with tracheobronchial obstruction. Materials and methods: Medical records of all pediatric surgical patients who underwent tracheobronchial metallic stenting in our center were reviewed retrospectively from 1996 to 2014. Patients’ demographic data, including etiology, associated anomalies and nature of obstruction were reviewed. Outcome measures include complications such as re-stenosis, granulation tissue, stent migration, fractured stent, maximal tracheal diameter achieved, weaning of ventilator and growth at interval follow-up.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220729
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.01
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.409

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Ling-
dc.contributor.authorChung, Patrick Ho Yu-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Kenneth Kak Yuen-
dc.contributor.authorTam, Paul Kwong Hang-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:50:23Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:50:23Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Surgery International, 2015, v. 31, n. 3, p. 249-254-
dc.identifier.issn0179-0358-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220729-
dc.description.abstract© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Results: Twelve balloon-expandable metallic stents were placed in the trachea (n = 10) and/or bronchi (n = 2) of 5 patients with a median age of 13 months (range 5–30 months). Etiology of the airway obstruction included congenital tracheal stenosis (n = 4), giant cervical and superior mediastinal lymphatic malformation with tracheobronchomalacia (n = 1). Seven complications were reported (3 patients developed granulation tissue, 2 patients had re-stenosis, 1 stent migrated, 1 stent fractured). All patients survived and were in good condition with a median follow-up of 16 years (range 11–18 years). Three patients weaned off ventilator and oxygen. Conclusions: Endoscopic stenting with metallic stent has satisfactory long-term outcome in treating infants with tracheobronchial obstruction. Introduction: Tracheobronchial obstruction, although uncommon in the pediatric age group, remains a challenging problem. We review the long-term outcome of endoscopic metallic stenting in infants with tracheobronchial obstruction. Materials and methods: Medical records of all pediatric surgical patients who underwent tracheobronchial metallic stenting in our center were reviewed retrospectively from 1996 to 2014. Patients’ demographic data, including etiology, associated anomalies and nature of obstruction were reviewed. Outcome measures include complications such as re-stenosis, granulation tissue, stent migration, fractured stent, maximal tracheal diameter achieved, weaning of ventilator and growth at interval follow-up.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00383/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Surgery International-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-015-3666-3-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectSelf-expandable stent-
dc.subjectMetallic stent-
dc.subjectTracheal stenosis-
dc.subjectTracheobronchomalacia-
dc.subjectAirway obstruction-
dc.titleManagement of tracheobronchial obstruction in infants using metallic stents: long-term outcome-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00383-015-3666-3-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84925486094-
dc.identifier.hkuros242705-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage249-
dc.identifier.epage254-
dc.identifier.eissn1437-9813-

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