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Article: Internationalization: The Hong Kong-China experience as a model for collaborative education in Asia

TitleInternationalization: The Hong Kong-China experience as a model for collaborative education in Asia
Authors
KeywordsTrain-the-trainers
Scientific writing
Pediatric oncology
Laparoscopic workshop
Issue Date2013
Citation
Pediatric Surgery International, 2013, v. 29, n. 10, p. 1053-1059 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The Hong Kong model for collaboration in education in Asia is based on internationalization. Hong Kong benefits from being an international city combining an Eastern heritage and a Western society. The University of Hong Kong ranks among the world's top 25 universities (2012/2013 QS world university rankings), and its Division of Paediatric Surgery has an international reputation in research and training. In the past two decades, Hong Kong has leading roles in major international pediatric surgical organizations including Pacific Association of Pediatric Surgeons, International Pediatric Endosurgery Group, Asian Association of Pediatric Surgeons and World Federation of Associations of Pediatric Surgeons. While Hong Kong has close collaboration with Japan and other advanced economies, the talk will focus on our transfer of international experience to Mainland China. Methods and results: (1) A Train-the-Trainer scheme consisting of a 1-year structured education program for next-generation leaders from selected centers enabled replication and proliferation of similar training nationwide. (2) A series of laparoscopic workshops resulted in training of over 1,300 surgeons in basic and advanced skills in minimally invasive surgery within 5 years and the establishment of a national specialist organization overseeing development and quality assurance. (3) A series of Cross-Strait Symposia on Pediatric Oncology established the foundation of multidisciplinary, multicenter collaboration in education and research in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. (4) Initiation of a scientific writing course will enhance surgical research and training in China. Conclusion: The Hong Kong experience may serve as a model of collaboration with other developing economies in Asia. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220714
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.01
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.409
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTam, Paul K H-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Kenneth K Y-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Long-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J. Z.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:50:21Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:50:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Surgery International, 2013, v. 29, n. 10, p. 1053-1059-
dc.identifier.issn0179-0358-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220714-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The Hong Kong model for collaboration in education in Asia is based on internationalization. Hong Kong benefits from being an international city combining an Eastern heritage and a Western society. The University of Hong Kong ranks among the world's top 25 universities (2012/2013 QS world university rankings), and its Division of Paediatric Surgery has an international reputation in research and training. In the past two decades, Hong Kong has leading roles in major international pediatric surgical organizations including Pacific Association of Pediatric Surgeons, International Pediatric Endosurgery Group, Asian Association of Pediatric Surgeons and World Federation of Associations of Pediatric Surgeons. While Hong Kong has close collaboration with Japan and other advanced economies, the talk will focus on our transfer of international experience to Mainland China. Methods and results: (1) A Train-the-Trainer scheme consisting of a 1-year structured education program for next-generation leaders from selected centers enabled replication and proliferation of similar training nationwide. (2) A series of laparoscopic workshops resulted in training of over 1,300 surgeons in basic and advanced skills in minimally invasive surgery within 5 years and the establishment of a national specialist organization overseeing development and quality assurance. (3) A series of Cross-Strait Symposia on Pediatric Oncology established the foundation of multidisciplinary, multicenter collaboration in education and research in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. (4) Initiation of a scientific writing course will enhance surgical research and training in China. Conclusion: The Hong Kong experience may serve as a model of collaboration with other developing economies in Asia. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Surgery International-
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectTrain-the-trainers-
dc.subjectScientific writing-
dc.subjectPediatric oncology-
dc.subjectLaparoscopic workshop-
dc.titleInternationalization: The Hong Kong-China experience as a model for collaborative education in Asia-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00383-013-3407-4-
dc.identifier.pmid23975023-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84885610686-
dc.identifier.hkuros227305-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage1053-
dc.identifier.epage1059-
dc.identifier.eissn1437-9813-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000325010700014-

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