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Article: Working memory impairment and its associated sleep-related respiratory parameters in children with obstructive sleep apnea

TitleWorking memory impairment and its associated sleep-related respiratory parameters in children with obstructive sleep apnea
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/sleep
Citation
Sleep Medicine, 2015, v. 16 n. 9, p. 1109-1115 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Objective: Working memory deficits in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been reported in previous studies, but the results were inconclusive. This study tried to address this issue by delineating working memory functions into executive processes and storage/maintenance components based on Baddeley’s working memory model. Methods: Working memory and basic attention tasks were administered on 23 OSA children aged 8–12 years and 22 age-, education-, and general cognitive functioning-matched controls. Data on overnight polysomnographic sleep study and working memory functions were compared between the two groups. Associations between respiratory-related parameters and cognitive performance were explored in the OSA group. Results: Compared with controls, children with OSA had poorer performance on both tasks of basic storage and central executive components in the verbal domain of working memory, above and beyond basic attention and processing speed impairments; such differences were not significant in the visuo-spatial domain. Moreover, correlational analyses and hierarchical regression analyses further suggested that obstructive apnea–hypopnea index (OAHI) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) nadir were associated with verbal working memory performance, highlighting the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA induced cognitive deficits. Conclusions: Verbal working memory impairments associated with OSA may compromise children’s learning potentials and neurocognitive development. Early identification of OSA and assessment of the associated neurocognitive deficits are of paramount importance. Reversibility of cognitive deficits after treatment would be a critical outcome indicator
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220659
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.339
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.363

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, EYY-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, EWM-
dc.contributor.authorLai, ESK-
dc.contributor.authorLau, KNT-
dc.contributor.authorAu, CT-
dc.contributor.authorYung, WH-
dc.contributor.authorLi, AM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:48:43Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:48:43Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationSleep Medicine, 2015, v. 16 n. 9, p. 1109-1115-
dc.identifier.issn1389-9457-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220659-
dc.description.abstractStudy Objective: Working memory deficits in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been reported in previous studies, but the results were inconclusive. This study tried to address this issue by delineating working memory functions into executive processes and storage/maintenance components based on Baddeley’s working memory model. Methods: Working memory and basic attention tasks were administered on 23 OSA children aged 8–12 years and 22 age-, education-, and general cognitive functioning-matched controls. Data on overnight polysomnographic sleep study and working memory functions were compared between the two groups. Associations between respiratory-related parameters and cognitive performance were explored in the OSA group. Results: Compared with controls, children with OSA had poorer performance on both tasks of basic storage and central executive components in the verbal domain of working memory, above and beyond basic attention and processing speed impairments; such differences were not significant in the visuo-spatial domain. Moreover, correlational analyses and hierarchical regression analyses further suggested that obstructive apnea–hypopnea index (OAHI) and oxygen saturation (SpO2) nadir were associated with verbal working memory performance, highlighting the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA induced cognitive deficits. Conclusions: Verbal working memory impairments associated with OSA may compromise children’s learning potentials and neurocognitive development. Early identification of OSA and assessment of the associated neurocognitive deficits are of paramount importance. Reversibility of cognitive deficits after treatment would be a critical outcome indicator-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/sleep-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep Medicine-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © 2015. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleWorking memory impairment and its associated sleep-related respiratory parameters in children with obstructive sleep apnea-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLau, EYY: eyylau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EYY=rp00634-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.sleep.2015.04.025-
dc.identifier.hkuros255355-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage1109-
dc.identifier.epage1115-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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