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Article: Conflict and Harmony between Buddhism and Chinese Culture

TitleConflict and Harmony between Buddhism and Chinese Culture
Authors
KeywordsBuddhism
Confucianism
Daoism
Filial piety
Issue Date2015
PublisherInternational Association for Buddhist Thought & Culture (국제불교문화사상사학회). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iabtc.org/
Citation
International Journal of Buddhist Thought and Culture, 2015, v. 25, p. 83-105 How to Cite?
국제불교문화사상사학회, 2015, v. 25, p. 83‑105 How to Cite?
AbstractWhen Buddhism was first introduced to China in the Han dynasty it met with a highly developed culture and civilization centered on Confucianism which emphasized on family life and society. Therefore, Buddhism faced a great challenge in its transmission and development in China as the Chinese way of life was very different from that of Buddhist. Although there had been conflicts among the three systems of thought namely Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism, but integration is the mainstream in the development of Chinese cultural thought as both Buddhism and Chinese thought uphold the open attitude of mind. Buddhism assimilated many Chinese elements such as ancestor worship and the emphasis on filial piety. Daoism became a religion by assimilating Buddhist monasticism, ideas and thought and rituals and Confucianism revived itself and became neo-Confucianism by assimilating many Buddhist thought and ways of thinking. Thus, Chinese culture has developed into a system by uniting the three religions into one with Confucianism at the centre supported by Daoism and Buddhism. For over two thousand years, Buddhism has interacted with all levels of Chinese culture such as literature, philosophy, morality, arts, architecture and folk religions and beliefs. As a result, Buddhism has successfully integrated into the traditional Chinese culture and has become one of the three pillars. In this paper, I will concentrate on the intellectual exchange between Buddhism and Chinese culture and outline the major issues from the historical perspective.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220239
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuang, X-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:33:25Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:33:25Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Buddhist Thought and Culture, 2015, v. 25, p. 83-105-
dc.identifier.citation국제불교문화사상사학회, 2015, v. 25, p. 83‑105-
dc.identifier.issn1598-7914-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220239-
dc.description.abstractWhen Buddhism was first introduced to China in the Han dynasty it met with a highly developed culture and civilization centered on Confucianism which emphasized on family life and society. Therefore, Buddhism faced a great challenge in its transmission and development in China as the Chinese way of life was very different from that of Buddhist. Although there had been conflicts among the three systems of thought namely Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism, but integration is the mainstream in the development of Chinese cultural thought as both Buddhism and Chinese thought uphold the open attitude of mind. Buddhism assimilated many Chinese elements such as ancestor worship and the emphasis on filial piety. Daoism became a religion by assimilating Buddhist monasticism, ideas and thought and rituals and Confucianism revived itself and became neo-Confucianism by assimilating many Buddhist thought and ways of thinking. Thus, Chinese culture has developed into a system by uniting the three religions into one with Confucianism at the centre supported by Daoism and Buddhism. For over two thousand years, Buddhism has interacted with all levels of Chinese culture such as literature, philosophy, morality, arts, architecture and folk religions and beliefs. As a result, Buddhism has successfully integrated into the traditional Chinese culture and has become one of the three pillars. In this paper, I will concentrate on the intellectual exchange between Buddhism and Chinese culture and outline the major issues from the historical perspective.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherInternational Association for Buddhist Thought & Culture (국제불교문화사상사학회). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iabtc.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Buddhist Thought and Culture-
dc.relation.ispartof국제불교문화사상사학회-
dc.subjectBuddhism-
dc.subjectConfucianism-
dc.subjectDaoism-
dc.subjectFilial piety-
dc.titleConflict and Harmony between Buddhism and Chinese Culture-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGuang, X: guangxin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGuang, X=rp01138-
dc.identifier.doi10.16893/IJBTC.25.4-
dc.identifier.hkuros256087-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.spage83-
dc.identifier.epage105-
dc.publisher.placeSeoul (서울)-
dc.customcontrol.immutablecsl 151103-

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