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Article: Prevalence and Predictive Factors for Peri-Implant Disease and Implant Failure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

TitlePrevalence and Predictive Factors for Peri-Implant Disease and Implant Failure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Journal of Periodontology, 2015, v. 86, p. 337-347 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Long-term studies worldwide indicate that peri-implant inflammation is a frequent finding and that the prevalence of peri-implantitis correlates with loading time. Implant loss, although less frequent, has serious oral health and economic consequences. An understanding of predictive factors for peri-implant disease and implant loss would help providers and patients make informed decisions. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed on 96 patients with 225 implants that were placed between 1998 and 2003. Implant placement data were collected from patient records, and patients presented for a clinical and radiographic follow-up examination. Implant status and periodontal status were determined, the data were analyzed to determine the prevalence of peri-implant disease or implant loss, and a predictive model was tested. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time for the patients was 10.9 years. The implant survival rate was 91.6%. Peri-implant mucositis was found in 33% of the implants and 48% of the patients, and peri-implantitis occurred in 16% of the implants and 26% of the patients. Individuals with peri-implantitis were twice as likely to report a problem with an implant as individuals with healthy implants. Peri-implantitis is associated with younger ages and diabetes at the time of placement and with periodontal status at the time of follow-up. Implant loss is associated with diabetes, immediate placement, and larger-diameter implants. CONCLUSIONS: One in four patients and one in six implants have peri-implantitis after 11 years. The data suggest that periodontal and diabetes status of the patient may be useful for predicting implant outcomes. KEYWORDS: Dental implants; diabetes mellitus; follow-up studies; peri-implantitis; periodontitis; risk factors
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220115

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDaubert, DM-
dc.contributor.authorWeinstein, BF-
dc.contributor.authorBordin, S-
dc.contributor.authorLeroux, BG-
dc.contributor.authorFlemmig, TF-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-16T06:29:25Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-16T06:29:25Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Periodontology, 2015, v. 86, p. 337-347-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/220115-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Long-term studies worldwide indicate that peri-implant inflammation is a frequent finding and that the prevalence of peri-implantitis correlates with loading time. Implant loss, although less frequent, has serious oral health and economic consequences. An understanding of predictive factors for peri-implant disease and implant loss would help providers and patients make informed decisions. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed on 96 patients with 225 implants that were placed between 1998 and 2003. Implant placement data were collected from patient records, and patients presented for a clinical and radiographic follow-up examination. Implant status and periodontal status were determined, the data were analyzed to determine the prevalence of peri-implant disease or implant loss, and a predictive model was tested. RESULTS: The mean follow-up time for the patients was 10.9 years. The implant survival rate was 91.6%. Peri-implant mucositis was found in 33% of the implants and 48% of the patients, and peri-implantitis occurred in 16% of the implants and 26% of the patients. Individuals with peri-implantitis were twice as likely to report a problem with an implant as individuals with healthy implants. Peri-implantitis is associated with younger ages and diabetes at the time of placement and with periodontal status at the time of follow-up. Implant loss is associated with diabetes, immediate placement, and larger-diameter implants. CONCLUSIONS: One in four patients and one in six implants have peri-implantitis after 11 years. The data suggest that periodontal and diabetes status of the patient may be useful for predicting implant outcomes. KEYWORDS: Dental implants; diabetes mellitus; follow-up studies; peri-implantitis; periodontitis; risk factors-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Periodontology-
dc.titlePrevalence and Predictive Factors for Peri-Implant Disease and Implant Failure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailFlemmig, TF: flemmig@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFlemmig, TF=rp01926-
dc.identifier.doi10.1902/jop.2014.140438-
dc.identifier.hkuros255263-
dc.identifier.volume86-
dc.identifier.spage337-
dc.identifier.epage347-

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