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postgraduate thesis: Occupy Central and the silent majority in Hong Kong

TitleOccupy Central and the silent majority in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Mak, J. [麥進琦]. (2015). Occupy Central and the silent majority in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5558890
AbstractWhile a wealth of research and news articles have written about Occupy Central and its participants and supporters, there is a gap in terms of the Silent Majority. This research seeks to investigate what factors or combination of factors contribute to a large unspecified majority of Hong Kong citizens who did not participate nor express their opinions publicly about Occupy Central.  Two theoretical perspectives are used to examine the Silent Majority. Noelle-Neumann’s (1993) Spiral of Silence suggests that people have a fear of isolation as a consequence for voicing their opinions; hence, individuals have a tendency to remain silent. Ajzen’s (1991) Theory of Planned Behaviour illustrates how individuals choose to carry out particular actions over another due to considerations of potential consequences of their behaviour. Methodologically, semi-structured interviews have been conducted with four respondents to explore the views and experiences of the Silent Majority, as well as the justifications and underlying rationale for their silent non-participation.  Results suggest that the Silent Majority encompasses a spectrum of silent non-participants ranging from individuals who support Occupy Central to individuals who do not; as well as individuals who are neutral or undecided. Some findings seem to support Noelle-Neumann’s (1993) theory regarding one’s fear of social isolation for expressing their opinions in public and Ajzen’s (1991) Theory of Planned Behaviour that individuals choose certain actions over another due to the potential repercussion of their own behaviour. Further, various factors contributing to the respondents’ silent non-participation have also been identified. These factors include 1) the respondents’ individual political stance, 2) their reluctance to be in breach of law and social order, and 3) the perceived risks and consequence of expressing ones’ opinions or participating in any political activities or movements.
DegreeMaster of Social Sciences
SubjectProtest movements - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramCriminology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219933

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMak, Jun-ki-
dc.contributor.author麥進琦-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-02T23:16:30Z-
dc.date.available2015-10-02T23:16:30Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationMak, J. [麥進琦]. (2015). Occupy Central and the silent majority in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5558890-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219933-
dc.description.abstractWhile a wealth of research and news articles have written about Occupy Central and its participants and supporters, there is a gap in terms of the Silent Majority. This research seeks to investigate what factors or combination of factors contribute to a large unspecified majority of Hong Kong citizens who did not participate nor express their opinions publicly about Occupy Central.  Two theoretical perspectives are used to examine the Silent Majority. Noelle-Neumann’s (1993) Spiral of Silence suggests that people have a fear of isolation as a consequence for voicing their opinions; hence, individuals have a tendency to remain silent. Ajzen’s (1991) Theory of Planned Behaviour illustrates how individuals choose to carry out particular actions over another due to considerations of potential consequences of their behaviour. Methodologically, semi-structured interviews have been conducted with four respondents to explore the views and experiences of the Silent Majority, as well as the justifications and underlying rationale for their silent non-participation.  Results suggest that the Silent Majority encompasses a spectrum of silent non-participants ranging from individuals who support Occupy Central to individuals who do not; as well as individuals who are neutral or undecided. Some findings seem to support Noelle-Neumann’s (1993) theory regarding one’s fear of social isolation for expressing their opinions in public and Ajzen’s (1991) Theory of Planned Behaviour that individuals choose certain actions over another due to the potential repercussion of their own behaviour. Further, various factors contributing to the respondents’ silent non-participation have also been identified. These factors include 1) the respondents’ individual political stance, 2) their reluctance to be in breach of law and social order, and 3) the perceived risks and consequence of expressing ones’ opinions or participating in any political activities or movements.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshProtest movements - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleOccupy Central and the silent majority in Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5558890-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Social Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineCriminology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

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