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Article: Dynamic localization of G-actin during membrane protrusion in neuronal motility

TitleDynamic localization of G-actin during membrane protrusion in neuronal motility
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
Current Biology, 2013, v. 23, n. 12, p. 1046-1056 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Actin-based cell motility is fundamental for development, function, and malignant events in eukaryotic organisms. During neural development, axonal growth cones depend on rapid assembly and disassembly of actin filaments (F-actin) for their guided extension to specific targets for wiring. Monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is the building block for F-actin but is not considered to play a direct role in spatiotemporal control of actin dynamics in cell motility. Results Here we report that a pool of G-actin dynamically localizes to the leading edge of growth cones and neuroblastoma cells to spatially elevate the G-/F-actin ratio that drives membrane protrusion and cell movement. Loss of G-actin localization leads to the cessation and retraction of membrane protrusions. Moreover, G-actin localization occurs asymmetrically in growth cones during attractive turning. Finally, we identify the actin monomer-binding proteins profilin and thymosin β4 as key molecules that localize actin monomers to the leading edge of lamellipodia for their motility. Conclusions Our results suggest that dynamic localization of G-actin provides a novel mechanism to regulate the spatiotemporal actin dynamics underlying membrane protrusion in cell locomotion and growth cone chemotaxis. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219881
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.983
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.729

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chi Wai-
dc.contributor.authorVitriol, Eric A.-
dc.contributor.authorShim, Sangwoo-
dc.contributor.authorWise, Ariel L.-
dc.contributor.authorVelayutham, Radhi P.-
dc.contributor.authorZheng, James Q.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-24T04:44:15Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-24T04:44:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Biology, 2013, v. 23, n. 12, p. 1046-1056-
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219881-
dc.description.abstractBackground Actin-based cell motility is fundamental for development, function, and malignant events in eukaryotic organisms. During neural development, axonal growth cones depend on rapid assembly and disassembly of actin filaments (F-actin) for their guided extension to specific targets for wiring. Monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is the building block for F-actin but is not considered to play a direct role in spatiotemporal control of actin dynamics in cell motility. Results Here we report that a pool of G-actin dynamically localizes to the leading edge of growth cones and neuroblastoma cells to spatially elevate the G-/F-actin ratio that drives membrane protrusion and cell movement. Loss of G-actin localization leads to the cessation and retraction of membrane protrusions. Moreover, G-actin localization occurs asymmetrically in growth cones during attractive turning. Finally, we identify the actin monomer-binding proteins profilin and thymosin β4 as key molecules that localize actin monomers to the leading edge of lamellipodia for their motility. Conclusions Our results suggest that dynamic localization of G-actin provides a novel mechanism to regulate the spatiotemporal actin dynamics underlying membrane protrusion in cell locomotion and growth cone chemotaxis. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Biology-
dc.titleDynamic localization of G-actin during membrane protrusion in neuronal motility-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cub.2013.04.057-
dc.identifier.pmid23746641-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84879286502-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage1046-
dc.identifier.epage1056-

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