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Article: Vaccination and the politics of medical knowledge in nineteenth-century Japan

TitleVaccination and the politics of medical knowledge in nineteenth-century Japan
Authors
KeywordsKanpō medicine
Japanese nationalism
Dutch studies (rangaku)
East Asian medicine
Public health
Smallpox
Vaccine
Issue Date2014
Citation
Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 2014, v. 88, n. 3, p. 431-456 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014, Johns Hopkins University Press. All rights reserved. The adoption of the cowpox vaccine in nineteenth-century Japan has often been seen as a more straightforward development than its introduction to other non-Western countries. However, the research leading to this conclusion has been based primarily on sources written by Japanese practitioners of Western- style medicine (ran), while the perspectives of Chinese-style (kan) practitioners, who were more numerous than ranpō practitioners but less likely to have shown immediate enthusiasm for vaccination, have been largely neglected. Kanpō doctors typically learned about vaccination from Chinese rather than European sources and often held an ambivalent attitude toward the vaccine’s foreign origins. This article develops an analysis of kanpō writings on vaccination and suggests that skepticism about the vaccine remained widespread for at least a decade after its initial arrival in Japan, providing new insights into both the initial opposition and the subsequent acceptance of the technique.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219762
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.632
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.516

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTrambaiolo, Daniel-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T02:57:54Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-23T02:57:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationBulletin of the History of Medicine, 2014, v. 88, n. 3, p. 431-456-
dc.identifier.issn0007-5140-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219762-
dc.description.abstract© 2014, Johns Hopkins University Press. All rights reserved. The adoption of the cowpox vaccine in nineteenth-century Japan has often been seen as a more straightforward development than its introduction to other non-Western countries. However, the research leading to this conclusion has been based primarily on sources written by Japanese practitioners of Western- style medicine (ran), while the perspectives of Chinese-style (kan) practitioners, who were more numerous than ranpō practitioners but less likely to have shown immediate enthusiasm for vaccination, have been largely neglected. Kanpō doctors typically learned about vaccination from Chinese rather than European sources and often held an ambivalent attitude toward the vaccine’s foreign origins. This article develops an analysis of kanpō writings on vaccination and suggests that skepticism about the vaccine remained widespread for at least a decade after its initial arrival in Japan, providing new insights into both the initial opposition and the subsequent acceptance of the technique.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBulletin of the History of Medicine-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectKanpō medicine-
dc.subjectJapanese nationalism-
dc.subjectDutch studies (rangaku)-
dc.subjectEast Asian medicine-
dc.subjectPublic health-
dc.subjectSmallpox-
dc.subjectVaccine-
dc.titleVaccination and the politics of medical knowledge in nineteenth-century Japan-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/bhm.2014.0047-
dc.identifier.pmid25345769-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84908112201-
dc.identifier.hkuros229750-
dc.identifier.volume88-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage431-
dc.identifier.epage456-

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