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Article: Mangrove carbon sink. Do burrowing crabs contribute to sediment carbon storage? Evidence from a Kenyan mangrove system

TitleMangrove carbon sink. Do burrowing crabs contribute to sediment carbon storage? Evidence from a Kenyan mangrove system
Authors
KeywordsMangrove
Soil
Crabs
Carbon Stock
Carbon Burial
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Sea Research, 2014, v. 85, p. 524-533 How to Cite?
AbstractMangrove ecosystems are acknowledged as a significant carbon reservoir, with a potential key role as carbon sinks. Little however is known on sediment/soil capacity to store organic carbon and the impact of benthic fauna on soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in mangrove C-poor soils. This study aimed to investigate the effects of macrobenthos on SOC storage and dynamic in mangrove forest at Gazi Bay (Kenya). Although the relatively low amount of organic carbon (OC%) in these soils, they resulted in the presence of large ecosystem carbon stock comparable to other forest ecosystems. SOC at Gazi bay ranged from 3.6kgm-2 in a Desert-like belt to 29.7kgm-2 in the Rhizophora belt considering the depth soil interval from 0cm to 80cm. The high spatial heterogeneity in the distribution and amount of SOC seemed to be explained by different dominant crab species and their impact on the soil environment. A further major determinant was the presence, in the subsoil, of horizons rich in organic matter, whose dating pointed to their formation being associated with sea level rise over the Holocene. Dating and soil morphological characters proved to be an effective support to discuss links between the strategies developed by macrobenthos and soil ecosystem functioning. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219727
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.148
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.011

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAndreetta, Anna-
dc.contributor.authorFusi, Marco-
dc.contributor.authorCameldi, Irene-
dc.contributor.authorCimò, Filippo-
dc.contributor.authorCarnicelli, Stefano-
dc.contributor.authorCannicci, Stefano-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T02:57:49Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-23T02:57:49Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sea Research, 2014, v. 85, p. 524-533-
dc.identifier.issn1385-1101-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219727-
dc.description.abstractMangrove ecosystems are acknowledged as a significant carbon reservoir, with a potential key role as carbon sinks. Little however is known on sediment/soil capacity to store organic carbon and the impact of benthic fauna on soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in mangrove C-poor soils. This study aimed to investigate the effects of macrobenthos on SOC storage and dynamic in mangrove forest at Gazi Bay (Kenya). Although the relatively low amount of organic carbon (OC%) in these soils, they resulted in the presence of large ecosystem carbon stock comparable to other forest ecosystems. SOC at Gazi bay ranged from 3.6kgm-2 in a Desert-like belt to 29.7kgm-2 in the Rhizophora belt considering the depth soil interval from 0cm to 80cm. The high spatial heterogeneity in the distribution and amount of SOC seemed to be explained by different dominant crab species and their impact on the soil environment. A further major determinant was the presence, in the subsoil, of horizons rich in organic matter, whose dating pointed to their formation being associated with sea level rise over the Holocene. Dating and soil morphological characters proved to be an effective support to discuss links between the strategies developed by macrobenthos and soil ecosystem functioning. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sea Research-
dc.subjectMangrove-
dc.subjectSoil-
dc.subjectCrabs-
dc.subjectCarbon Stock-
dc.subjectCarbon Burial-
dc.titleMangrove carbon sink. Do burrowing crabs contribute to sediment carbon storage? Evidence from a Kenyan mangrove system-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.seares.2013.08.010-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84887818531-
dc.identifier.volume85-
dc.identifier.spage524-
dc.identifier.epage533-

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