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Article: The effect of sewage discharge on the ecosystem engineering activities of two East African fiddler crab species: Consequences for mangrove ecosystem functioning

TitleThe effect of sewage discharge on the ecosystem engineering activities of two East African fiddler crab species: Consequences for mangrove ecosystem functioning
Authors
KeywordsEast Africa
Mangrove
Sewage
Uca spp
Ecosystem engineering
Bioturbation
Issue Date2011
Citation
Marine Environmental Research, 2011, v. 71, n. 1, p. 53-61 How to Cite?
AbstractA number of studies have suggested that mangrove forests and their faunal components may be pre-adapted to the impact of organic waste discharge, making them possible natural wastewater treatment wetlands. However, the results from recent research are contradictory. Some studies have shown that negative effects, sometimes subtle and difficult to observe, can be detected on specific biotic components of forests subjected to organic pollution. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate possible alterations in the ecosystem engineering activities of a fiddler crab community dominating the landward belts of Kenyan mangrove forests. The total processed sediment produced by burrowing and foraging activities in a population from a peri-urban mangrove area receiving untreated domestic sewage was compared with that from a forest not affected by urban wastewater. The results showed how the peri-urban site hosted a higher biomass of crabs, which produced a significantly lower amount of processed sediment compared with the pristine site, resulting in a lower total top sediment mixing activity of the crabs. Thus, the present study showed a link between sewage exposure and top sediment reworking by crabs, which is potentially beneficial for mangrove growth and ecosystem functioning. This represents a possible example of cryptic ecological degradation in mangal systems. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219641
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.769
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.113

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBartolini, Fabrizio-
dc.contributor.authorCimò, Filippo-
dc.contributor.authorFusi, Marco-
dc.contributor.authorDahdouh-Guebas, Farid-
dc.contributor.authorLopes, Gil Penha-
dc.contributor.authorCannicci, Stefano-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T02:57:36Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-23T02:57:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationMarine Environmental Research, 2011, v. 71, n. 1, p. 53-61-
dc.identifier.issn0141-1136-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219641-
dc.description.abstractA number of studies have suggested that mangrove forests and their faunal components may be pre-adapted to the impact of organic waste discharge, making them possible natural wastewater treatment wetlands. However, the results from recent research are contradictory. Some studies have shown that negative effects, sometimes subtle and difficult to observe, can be detected on specific biotic components of forests subjected to organic pollution. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate possible alterations in the ecosystem engineering activities of a fiddler crab community dominating the landward belts of Kenyan mangrove forests. The total processed sediment produced by burrowing and foraging activities in a population from a peri-urban mangrove area receiving untreated domestic sewage was compared with that from a forest not affected by urban wastewater. The results showed how the peri-urban site hosted a higher biomass of crabs, which produced a significantly lower amount of processed sediment compared with the pristine site, resulting in a lower total top sediment mixing activity of the crabs. Thus, the present study showed a link between sewage exposure and top sediment reworking by crabs, which is potentially beneficial for mangrove growth and ecosystem functioning. This represents a possible example of cryptic ecological degradation in mangal systems. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Environmental Research-
dc.subjectEast Africa-
dc.subjectMangrove-
dc.subjectSewage-
dc.subjectUca spp-
dc.subjectEcosystem engineering-
dc.subjectBioturbation-
dc.titleThe effect of sewage discharge on the ecosystem engineering activities of two East African fiddler crab species: Consequences for mangrove ecosystem functioning-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.marenvres.2010.10.002-
dc.identifier.pmid21047678-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651076121-
dc.identifier.volume71-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage53-
dc.identifier.epage61-

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