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Conference Paper: Cyber attacks and political events: the case of the Occupy Central Campaign

TitleCyber attacks and political events: the case of the Occupy Central Campaign
Authors
KeywordsPolitical events
Cyber attacks
Occupy Central campaign
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/series/6102
Citation
The 9th IFIP 11.10 International Conference (ICCIP 2015), Arlington, VA., 16-18 March 2015, In IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 2015, v. 466, p. 17-27 How to Cite?
AbstractOccupy Central was a Hong Kong civil disobedience campaign that began in September 2014 with the goal of forcing Mainland China to allow Hong Kong to implement genuine universal suffrage as demanded by Hong Kong residents. The campaign initially encouraged citizens to block the Central District, Hong Kong’s financial center. However, as the campaign evolved, large protests were organized all over Hong Kong. While vigorous clashes occurred between Occupy Central protesters and police officers on the streets of Hong Kong, cyber attacks were launched quietly by supporters of both sides against each other’s assets. The cyber weapons included mobile applications with malware for surveillance, tools for launching distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and sophisticated phishing emails with advanced persistent threat functionality. This chapter presents information about cyber attacks related to the Occupy Central campaign and classifies the attacks based on their purpose, techniques, targets and propagation. Based on the attack classification and timeline, a framework is provided that helps predict attack patterns and behavior in order to prevent or mitigate attacks launched during similar political events.
DescriptionThis series vol. entitled: Critical Infrastructure Protection IX: 9th IFIP 11.10 International Conference, ICCIP 2015, Arlington, VA, USA, March 16-18, 2015, Revised Selected Papers
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219236
ISBN
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.160
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChow, KP-
dc.contributor.authorYau, KKK-
dc.contributor.authorLi, FKF-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T07:18:28Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T07:18:28Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 9th IFIP 11.10 International Conference (ICCIP 2015), Arlington, VA., 16-18 March 2015, In IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 2015, v. 466, p. 17-27-
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-26566-7-
dc.identifier.issn1868-4238-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219236-
dc.descriptionThis series vol. entitled: Critical Infrastructure Protection IX: 9th IFIP 11.10 International Conference, ICCIP 2015, Arlington, VA, USA, March 16-18, 2015, Revised Selected Papers-
dc.description.abstractOccupy Central was a Hong Kong civil disobedience campaign that began in September 2014 with the goal of forcing Mainland China to allow Hong Kong to implement genuine universal suffrage as demanded by Hong Kong residents. The campaign initially encouraged citizens to block the Central District, Hong Kong’s financial center. However, as the campaign evolved, large protests were organized all over Hong Kong. While vigorous clashes occurred between Occupy Central protesters and police officers on the streets of Hong Kong, cyber attacks were launched quietly by supporters of both sides against each other’s assets. The cyber weapons included mobile applications with malware for surveillance, tools for launching distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks and sophisticated phishing emails with advanced persistent threat functionality. This chapter presents information about cyber attacks related to the Occupy Central campaign and classifies the attacks based on their purpose, techniques, targets and propagation. Based on the attack classification and timeline, a framework is provided that helps predict attack patterns and behavior in order to prevent or mitigate attacks launched during similar political events.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/series/6102-
dc.relation.ispartofIFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-26567-4_2-
dc.subjectPolitical events-
dc.subjectCyber attacks-
dc.subjectOccupy Central campaign-
dc.titleCyber attacks and political events: the case of the Occupy Central Campaign-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailChow, KP: kpchow@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYau, KKK: kenyaukk@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, FKF: fkfli@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChow, KP=rp00111-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-26567-4_2-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84951870098-
dc.identifier.hkuros254955-
dc.identifier.volume466-
dc.identifier.spage17-
dc.identifier.epage27-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000369166300002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 151127-

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