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Article: Three-dimensional printing-based electro-millifluidic devices for fabricating multi-compartment particles

TitleThree-dimensional printing-based electro-millifluidic devices for fabricating multi-compartment particles
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics. The Journal's web site is located at http://bmf.aip.org
Citation
Biomicrofluidics, 2014, v. 8 n. 6, article no. 064112 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this work, we demonstrate the use of stereolithographic 3D printing to fabricate millifluidic devices, which are used to engineer particles with multiple compartments. As the 3D design is directly transferred to the actual prototype, this method accommodates 3D millimeter-scaled features that are difficult to achieve by either lithographic-based microfabrication or traditional macrofabrication techniques. We exploit this approach to produce millifluidic networks to deliver multiple fluidic components. By taking advantage of the laminar flow, the fluidic components can form liquid jets with distinct patterns, and each pattern has clear boundaries between the liquid phases. Afterwards, droplets with controlled size are fabricated by spraying the liquid jet in an electric field, and subsequently converted to particles after a solidification step. As a demonstration, we fabricate calcium alginate particles with structures of (1) slice-by-slice multiple lamellae, (2) concentric core-shells, and (3) petals surrounding the particle centers. Furthermore, distinct hybrid particles combining two or more of the above structures are also obtained. These compartmentalized particles impart spatially dependent functionalities and properties. To show their applicability, various ingredients, including fruit juices, drugs, and magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated in the different compartments as proof-of-concepts for applications, including food, drug delivery, and bioassays. Our 3D printed electro-millifluidic approach represents a convenient and robust method to extend the range of structures of functional particles.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219123
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.708
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.794

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, QL-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Z-
dc.contributor.authorShum, HC-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T07:13:45Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T07:13:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationBiomicrofluidics, 2014, v. 8 n. 6, article no. 064112-
dc.identifier.issn1932-1058-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/219123-
dc.description.abstractIn this work, we demonstrate the use of stereolithographic 3D printing to fabricate millifluidic devices, which are used to engineer particles with multiple compartments. As the 3D design is directly transferred to the actual prototype, this method accommodates 3D millimeter-scaled features that are difficult to achieve by either lithographic-based microfabrication or traditional macrofabrication techniques. We exploit this approach to produce millifluidic networks to deliver multiple fluidic components. By taking advantage of the laminar flow, the fluidic components can form liquid jets with distinct patterns, and each pattern has clear boundaries between the liquid phases. Afterwards, droplets with controlled size are fabricated by spraying the liquid jet in an electric field, and subsequently converted to particles after a solidification step. As a demonstration, we fabricate calcium alginate particles with structures of (1) slice-by-slice multiple lamellae, (2) concentric core-shells, and (3) petals surrounding the particle centers. Furthermore, distinct hybrid particles combining two or more of the above structures are also obtained. These compartmentalized particles impart spatially dependent functionalities and properties. To show their applicability, various ingredients, including fruit juices, drugs, and magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated in the different compartments as proof-of-concepts for applications, including food, drug delivery, and bioassays. Our 3D printed electro-millifluidic approach represents a convenient and robust method to extend the range of structures of functional particles.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Institute of Physics. The Journal's web site is located at http://bmf.aip.org-
dc.relation.ispartofBiomicrofluidics-
dc.rightsBiomicrofluidics. Copyright © American Institute of Physics.-
dc.rightsCopyright 2015 American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics. The following article appeared in Biomicrofluidics, 2014, v. 8 n. 6, article no. 064112 and may be found at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/bmf/8/6/10.1063/1.4902929-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThree-dimensional printing-based electro-millifluidic devices for fabricating multi-compartment particles-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailShum, HC: ashum@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityShum, HC=rp01439-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1063/1.4902929-
dc.identifier.hkuros250683-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage064112-1-
dc.identifier.epage064112-11-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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