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Article: siRNA Versus miRNA as Therapeutics for Gene Silencing

TitlesiRNA Versus miRNA as Therapeutics for Gene Silencing
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/mtna/index.html
Citation
Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids, 2015, v. 4 n. 9, p. Article no. e252 How to Cite?
AbstractDiscovered a little over two decades ago, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs with important roles in gene regulation. They have recently been investigated as novel classes of therapeutic agents for the treatment of a wide range of disorders including cancers and infections. Clinical trials of siRNA- and miRNA-based drugs have already been initiated. siRNAs and miRNAs share many similarities, both are short duplex RNA molecules that exert gene silencing effects at the post-transcriptional level by targeting messenger RNA (mRNA), yet their mechanisms of action and clinical applications are distinct. The major difference between siRNAs and miRNAs is that the former are highly specific with only one mRNA target, whereas the latter have multiple targets. The therapeutic approaches of siRNAs and miRNAs are therefore very different. Hence, this review provides a comparison between therapeutic siRNAs and miRNAs in terms of their mechanisms of action, physicochemical properties, delivery, and clinical applications. Moreover, the challenges in developing both classes of RNA as therapeutics are also discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218805
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.048
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.320

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, JKW-
dc.contributor.authorCHOW, YT-
dc.contributor.authorZHANG, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SWS-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:53:58Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:53:58Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationMolecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids, 2015, v. 4 n. 9, p. Article no. e252-
dc.identifier.issn2162-2531-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218805-
dc.description.abstractDiscovered a little over two decades ago, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs with important roles in gene regulation. They have recently been investigated as novel classes of therapeutic agents for the treatment of a wide range of disorders including cancers and infections. Clinical trials of siRNA- and miRNA-based drugs have already been initiated. siRNAs and miRNAs share many similarities, both are short duplex RNA molecules that exert gene silencing effects at the post-transcriptional level by targeting messenger RNA (mRNA), yet their mechanisms of action and clinical applications are distinct. The major difference between siRNAs and miRNAs is that the former are highly specific with only one mRNA target, whereas the latter have multiple targets. The therapeutic approaches of siRNAs and miRNAs are therefore very different. Hence, this review provides a comparison between therapeutic siRNAs and miRNAs in terms of their mechanisms of action, physicochemical properties, delivery, and clinical applications. Moreover, the challenges in developing both classes of RNA as therapeutics are also discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/mtna/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlesiRNA Versus miRNA as Therapeutics for Gene Silencing-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLam, JKW: jkwlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, SWS: swsleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, JKW=rp01346-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, SWS=rp00235-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/mtna.2015.23-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84954441161-
dc.identifier.hkuros255091-
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spageArticle no. e252-
dc.identifier.epageArticle no. e252-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.f1000725789165-

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