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Conference Paper: Archetypal areal features in the African English-lexifier Creoles

TitleArchetypal areal features in the African English-lexifier Creoles
Authors
KeywordsCreole
Convergence
Adstrate
Issue Date2015
Citation
The 8th World Congress of African Linguistics (WOCAL-8), Kyoto, Japan, 20-24 August 2015. How to Cite?
AbstractIt seems natural that the languages belonging to the African branch of the family of Afro-Caribbean English-lexifier Creoles and extended Pidgins (AECs) should form part of the convergence movement that typifies the greater West African linguistic area. In this paper, I will focus on several features to show that adstrate transfer from African languages due to widespread multilingualism as well as substrate transfer through language shift to creoles and extended pidgins has indeed been leaving traces in the linguistic systems of the creoles and pidgins. I argue that the AECs, despite them being largely neglected in the discussion, are of great value in the quest to identify cross-cutting areal features in West Africa. The heterogenous origins of these languages from genetically disparate African source languages means that ...
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218651

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, K-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:49:24Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:49:24Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 8th World Congress of African Linguistics (WOCAL-8), Kyoto, Japan, 20-24 August 2015.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218651-
dc.description.abstractIt seems natural that the languages belonging to the African branch of the family of Afro-Caribbean English-lexifier Creoles and extended Pidgins (AECs) should form part of the convergence movement that typifies the greater West African linguistic area. In this paper, I will focus on several features to show that adstrate transfer from African languages due to widespread multilingualism as well as substrate transfer through language shift to creoles and extended pidgins has indeed been leaving traces in the linguistic systems of the creoles and pidgins. I argue that the AECs, despite them being largely neglected in the discussion, are of great value in the quest to identify cross-cutting areal features in West Africa. The heterogenous origins of these languages from genetically disparate African source languages means that ...-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Congress of African Linguistics, WOCAL-8-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCreole-
dc.subjectConvergence-
dc.subjectAdstrate-
dc.titleArchetypal areal features in the African English-lexifier Creoles-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros251879-

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