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Book Chapter: Right to the City: A Liberal-Democratic Perspective

TitleRight to the City: A Liberal-Democratic Perspective
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherElsevier
Citation
Right to the City: A Liberal-Democratic Perspective. In Wright, JD (Ed.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (2nd ed.), v. 18, p. 673-679. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractOver the last four decades, the concept ‘the right to the city,’ first developed by French philosopher Henry Lefebvre, has traveled from Europe to the rest of the world. This article discusses the key questions relating to the right to the city, and provides an overview of the evolution of this concept and how this abstract concept has inspired and empowered the struggles to fight against capitalist globalization worldwide, in particular the global south. In the global north, the right to the city has been widely exploited as an important tool to safeguard citizen's equal access to scarce social resources and opportunities, whereas in the global south, its enlightening power is being actively excavated to foster social equity, civil society, and democracy. The creative exploitation of this concept has been put in place in a variety of locales and leads to the enactment of a number of extended agenda locally and internationally. The enduring global economic recession provides opportunities for more expansive and interconnected exercises of the right to the city through allying the North and the South.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218465
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, S-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:38:20Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:38:20Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationRight to the City: A Liberal-Democratic Perspective. In Wright, JD (Ed.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (2nd ed.), v. 18, p. 673-679. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2015-
dc.identifier.isbn9780080970868-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218465-
dc.description.abstractOver the last four decades, the concept ‘the right to the city,’ first developed by French philosopher Henry Lefebvre, has traveled from Europe to the rest of the world. This article discusses the key questions relating to the right to the city, and provides an overview of the evolution of this concept and how this abstract concept has inspired and empowered the struggles to fight against capitalist globalization worldwide, in particular the global south. In the global north, the right to the city has been widely exploited as an important tool to safeguard citizen's equal access to scarce social resources and opportunities, whereas in the global south, its enlightening power is being actively excavated to foster social equity, civil society, and democracy. The creative exploitation of this concept has been put in place in a variety of locales and leads to the enactment of a number of extended agenda locally and internationally. The enduring global economic recession provides opportunities for more expansive and interconnected exercises of the right to the city through allying the North and the South.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (2nd ed.)-
dc.titleRight to the City: A Liberal-Democratic Perspective-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailHe, S: sjhe@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHe, S=rp01996-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-08-097086-8.74066-9-
dc.identifier.hkuros254262-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.spage673-
dc.identifier.epage679-
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam-

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