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Book: Language Use, Proficiency and Attitudes in Hong Kong

TitleLanguage Use, Proficiency and Attitudes in Hong Kong
香港居民語言應用、語言能力及語言態度研究
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSocial Sciences Research Centre, the University of Hong Kong
Citation
Bacon-Shone, J; Bolton, KR & Luke, KK. Language Use, Proficiency and Attitudes in Hong Kong. Hong Kong: Social Sciences Research Centre, the University of Hong Kong. 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study builds on the detailed empirical research of the three investigators, who have been collaborating on researching the Hong Kong linguistic situation since the early 1980s. This research utilises social survey methodology to investigate which languages are used within the community. In more technical terms, this has involved carrying out ‘sociolinguistic surveys’ (surveys of languages in society) to investigate which languages are learnt, and which are used, by whom to whom, across a range of settings (or ‘domains’) in Hong Kong society. Previously, three such surveys have been conducted, in 1983, 1993, and 2003. The 1983 sociolinguistic survey used faceto-face interviews with a total of 1240 respondents (Bolton and Luke 1999). This was followed, in 1993 and 2003, by two telephone surveys conducted by the Social Sciences Research Centre of The University of Hong Kong, where a total of 886 respondents were interviewed in the 1993 survey, and 1060 in the 2003 (Bacon-Shone and Bolton 1998, 2008). One broad aim of all three surveys was to describe patterns of language acquisition, language use, and attitudes to language policies in Hong Kong. This study carried out a sociolinguistic survey of Hong Kong in 2014 together with detailed reanalysis of the 2011 census data across the 18 districts and 412 constituency areas, which yields useful and applicable results relating to ethnic/linguistic minorities, multilingualism, multiculturalism, and language planning, of direct interest to public policy in Hong Kong. It also calibrates for the first time, using expert assessment, selfreported claims of proficiency in oral English and Putonghua and written English and simplified Chinese.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218437
ISBN
Dataset
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBacon-Shone, J-
dc.contributor.authorBolton, KR-
dc.contributor.authorLuke, KK-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:37:26Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:37:26Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationBacon-Shone, J; Bolton, KR & Luke, KK. Language Use, Proficiency and Attitudes in Hong Kong. Hong Kong: Social Sciences Research Centre, the University of Hong Kong. 2015-
dc.identifier.isbn9789627558002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218437-
dc.description.abstractThis study builds on the detailed empirical research of the three investigators, who have been collaborating on researching the Hong Kong linguistic situation since the early 1980s. This research utilises social survey methodology to investigate which languages are used within the community. In more technical terms, this has involved carrying out ‘sociolinguistic surveys’ (surveys of languages in society) to investigate which languages are learnt, and which are used, by whom to whom, across a range of settings (or ‘domains’) in Hong Kong society. Previously, three such surveys have been conducted, in 1983, 1993, and 2003. The 1983 sociolinguistic survey used faceto-face interviews with a total of 1240 respondents (Bolton and Luke 1999). This was followed, in 1993 and 2003, by two telephone surveys conducted by the Social Sciences Research Centre of The University of Hong Kong, where a total of 886 respondents were interviewed in the 1993 survey, and 1060 in the 2003 (Bacon-Shone and Bolton 1998, 2008). One broad aim of all three surveys was to describe patterns of language acquisition, language use, and attitudes to language policies in Hong Kong. This study carried out a sociolinguistic survey of Hong Kong in 2014 together with detailed reanalysis of the 2011 census data across the 18 districts and 412 constituency areas, which yields useful and applicable results relating to ethnic/linguistic minorities, multilingualism, multiculturalism, and language planning, of direct interest to public policy in Hong Kong. It also calibrates for the first time, using expert assessment, selfreported claims of proficiency in oral English and Putonghua and written English and simplified Chinese.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSocial Sciences Research Centre, the University of Hong Kong-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleLanguage Use, Proficiency and Attitudes in Hong Kong-
dc.title香港居民語言應用、語言能力及語言態度研究-
dc.typeBook-
dc.identifier.emailBacon-Shone, J: johnbs@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBacon-Shone, J=rp00056-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros251054-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage119-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.relation.projectLanguage use, proficiency and attitudes in Hong Kong-
dc.relation.dataData from LANGUAGE USE, PROFICIENCY AND ATTITUDES IN HONG KONG-

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