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Conference Paper: Promoting and restoring emotional well-being: effects of clay art therapy for depressed patients

TitlePromoting and restoring emotional well-being: effects of clay art therapy for depressed patients
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160
Citation
The 36th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2015), San Antonio, TX., 22-25 April 2015. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2015, v. 49 suppl 1, p. S79 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: Depression creates huge socioeconomic problems globally and will become the most serious cause of disability in 2030 (WHO, 2008). Integrative verbal/nonverbal psychosocial interventions on depression have documented benefits of better understanding and communication of feelings and thoughts, improvement of general mental health condition and increase of self-confidence in depressed patients. As one of the integrative arts therapy models, Clay Art Therapy (CAT) combines sensory, kinesthetic and psychological treatment components in supporting patients with psychological distress. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of CAT on depressed patients which have been rarely reported in the literature. METHODS: The study adopted a randomized control design in which 79 depressed patients from outpatient clinics were randomly allocated into the CAT intervention group (CAT) and non-directive Visual Art control group (VA).Both groups composed of six 2.5-hourweekly sessions. Intervention efficacy was measured by the Chinese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). Data were collected at baseline, end of treatment (T1) and three weeks after (T2). RESULTS: Results of repeated measures ANOVA showed significant difference between CAT and VA, F(1, 59) = 6.028, p = .017. Participants in CAT had a rapid drop of scores from baseline (M=21.93, SD=7.54) to T1 (M=15.00, SD=8.82) with a significant mean decrease of 6.93 (95% CI, 3.26 to 10.59), t(40) = 3.82, p < .000. The change from baseline to T2 (M=13.10, SD=7.69)was also significant and the score had a significant decrease of 8.83 (95% CI, 5.63 to 12.03), t(40) = 5.59, p < .000. Change of scores in between the three time points of measurement in VA was insignificant. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that participants can benefit more from CAT than VA on reduction of depressive signs and improvement of general mental health. Treatment effects can be maintained for three weeks. CAT can potentially be used on depressed patients. Other psychosocial benefits and the machanisms of the therapy is worthy of further investigation.
DescriptionPaper Session 10
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218259
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.112

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNan, JKM-
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:31:57Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:31:57Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 36th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2015), San Antonio, TX., 22-25 April 2015. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2015, v. 49 suppl 1, p. S79-
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218259-
dc.descriptionPaper Session 10-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Depression creates huge socioeconomic problems globally and will become the most serious cause of disability in 2030 (WHO, 2008). Integrative verbal/nonverbal psychosocial interventions on depression have documented benefits of better understanding and communication of feelings and thoughts, improvement of general mental health condition and increase of self-confidence in depressed patients. As one of the integrative arts therapy models, Clay Art Therapy (CAT) combines sensory, kinesthetic and psychological treatment components in supporting patients with psychological distress. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of CAT on depressed patients which have been rarely reported in the literature. METHODS: The study adopted a randomized control design in which 79 depressed patients from outpatient clinics were randomly allocated into the CAT intervention group (CAT) and non-directive Visual Art control group (VA).Both groups composed of six 2.5-hourweekly sessions. Intervention efficacy was measured by the Chinese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12). Data were collected at baseline, end of treatment (T1) and three weeks after (T2). RESULTS: Results of repeated measures ANOVA showed significant difference between CAT and VA, F(1, 59) = 6.028, p = .017. Participants in CAT had a rapid drop of scores from baseline (M=21.93, SD=7.54) to T1 (M=15.00, SD=8.82) with a significant mean decrease of 6.93 (95% CI, 3.26 to 10.59), t(40) = 3.82, p < .000. The change from baseline to T2 (M=13.10, SD=7.69)was also significant and the score had a significant decrease of 8.83 (95% CI, 5.63 to 12.03), t(40) = 5.59, p < .000. Change of scores in between the three time points of measurement in VA was insignificant. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that participants can benefit more from CAT than VA on reduction of depressive signs and improvement of general mental health. Treatment effects can be maintained for three weeks. CAT can potentially be used on depressed patients. Other psychosocial benefits and the machanisms of the therapy is worthy of further investigation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Behavioral Medicine-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12160-015-9688-1-
dc.titlePromoting and restoring emotional well-being: effects of clay art therapy for depressed patients-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailNan, JKM: joshuaat@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNan, JKM=rp02070-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12160-015-9688-1-
dc.identifier.hkuros253692-
dc.identifier.volume49-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl 1-
dc.identifier.spageS79-
dc.identifier.epageS79-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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