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Conference Paper: Multinational contracting into Australia: developing Dunning’s theory and case study design

TitleMultinational contracting into Australia: developing Dunning’s theory and case study design
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherAssociation of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM). The Proceedings' web site is located at http://www.arcom.ac.uk/
Citation
Proceedings of the 28th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM) Conference, Edinburgh, UK, 3-5 September 2012, v. 2, p. 913-923 How to Cite?
AbstractIn response to the need to leverage private finance and the lack of competition in some parts of the Australian public sector infrastructure market, the Australian Federal government has demonstrated its desire to attract new sources of in-bound foreign direct investment (FDI) by multinational contractors. This study aims to update progress towards an investigation into the determinants of multinational contractors’ willingness to bid for Australian public sector major road and bridges. This research deploys Dunning’s eclectic theory for the first time in terms of in-bound FDI by multinational contractors into Australia. Elsewhere, the authors have developed Dunning’s principal hypothesis to suit the context of this research and to address a weakness arising in this hypothesis that is based on a nominal (yes or no) approach to the ownership, location and internalization (OLI) factors in Dunning’s eclectic framework and which fails to speak to the relative explanatory power of these factors. The authors have completed a first stage test of this development of Dunning’s hypothesis based on publically available secondary data, in which it was concluded tentatively that the location factor appears to have the greatest explanatory power. This paper aims to present, for the first time, a further and novel development of the operation of Dunning’s OLI factors within the context of multinational contracting, as well as a preview of the design and planned analysis of the next empirical stage in this research concerning case studies. Finally, and beyond the theoretical contributions expected, other expected contributions are mentioned concerning research method and practical implications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218213
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRahman, A-
dc.contributor.authorBridge, AJ-
dc.contributor.authorRowlinson, SM-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, T-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:30:09Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:30:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 28th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM) Conference, Edinburgh, UK, 3-5 September 2012, v. 2, p. 913-923-
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-9552390-6-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218213-
dc.description.abstractIn response to the need to leverage private finance and the lack of competition in some parts of the Australian public sector infrastructure market, the Australian Federal government has demonstrated its desire to attract new sources of in-bound foreign direct investment (FDI) by multinational contractors. This study aims to update progress towards an investigation into the determinants of multinational contractors’ willingness to bid for Australian public sector major road and bridges. This research deploys Dunning’s eclectic theory for the first time in terms of in-bound FDI by multinational contractors into Australia. Elsewhere, the authors have developed Dunning’s principal hypothesis to suit the context of this research and to address a weakness arising in this hypothesis that is based on a nominal (yes or no) approach to the ownership, location and internalization (OLI) factors in Dunning’s eclectic framework and which fails to speak to the relative explanatory power of these factors. The authors have completed a first stage test of this development of Dunning’s hypothesis based on publically available secondary data, in which it was concluded tentatively that the location factor appears to have the greatest explanatory power. This paper aims to present, for the first time, a further and novel development of the operation of Dunning’s OLI factors within the context of multinational contracting, as well as a preview of the design and planned analysis of the next empirical stage in this research concerning case studies. Finally, and beyond the theoretical contributions expected, other expected contributions are mentioned concerning research method and practical implications.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAssociation of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM). The Proceedings' web site is located at http://www.arcom.ac.uk/-
dc.relation.ispartofAssociation of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM) Annual Conference-
dc.titleMultinational contracting into Australia: developing Dunning’s theory and case study design-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailRowlinson, SM: hrecsmr@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityRowlinson, SM=rp01020-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84911932151-
dc.identifier.hkuros253529-
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.spage913-
dc.identifier.epage923-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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