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Conference Paper: Rethinking social support and post-traumatic growth: a cross-sectional study of Chinese with breast cancer

TitleRethinking social support and post-traumatic growth: a cross-sectional study of Chinese with breast cancer
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Oncology psychology medical sciences
Psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2015
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 17th World Congress of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS 2015), Washington, DC., 28 July-1 August 2015. In Psycho-Oncology, 2015, v. 24 suppl. S2, p. 270, abstract P2-78 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Social support is regarded as catalyst of thriving for people recovering from cancer. Nevertheless, little research has been dedicated to explore how different aspects of social support may benefit psychological growth in trauma. METHODS: 75 Chinese women with breast cancer, attending out-patient clinic, were surveyed using a questionnaire packet composing of validated scales in Chinese on post-traumatic growth, perceived social support, and relevant demographics. Regression analyses were conducted to explore the associations between aspects of social support and dimensions of post-traumatic growth. RESULTS: Controlling on age, marital status, religiosity, and treatment modality, positive social interaction was associated with post-traumatic growth of self (β = 0.08, p ≤ 0.05), interpersonal connectedness (β=0.06, p≤ 0.01), life orientation (β=0.04, p≤ 0.05) and spirituality (β=0.06, p≤ 0.01). Emotional-informational support was associated with growths in connectedness (β=0.05, p≤ 0.05), life orientation (β=0.03, p≤ 0.01) and spirituality (β=0.05, p≤ 0.05). In addition, affectionate support was associated with self (β=0.11, p≤ 0.01) and interpersonal growth (β=0.05, p≤ 0.01), while tangible support only associated with interpersonal growth (β=0.04, p≤ 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Perceived social support is positively associated with post-traumatic growth for Chinese recovering from breast cancer; whereas different dimensions of social support appeared to contribute differently to post-traumatic growth. Perceived positive social interactions appeared to be a prominent factor associated with all dimensions of post-traumatic growth. Research Implications: Very few studies explore the impact of different kinds of social support on promoting positive coping outcomes among people with cancer. Results in the present study suggested that different kind of social support might contribute to a different aspect of post-traumatic growth, future research studies may consider exploring the relationships of different type of social support and other coping outcomes, so that specific intervention models could be developed to help family with cancer cope. Practice Implications: Findings of the present study highlighted the importance of family-based interventions in helping people with cancer cope in the Chinese community. It appeared that interpersonal connectedness be the catalyst for all aspects of post-traumatic growth, while the impact of tangible support appeared benign. The findings lean support to family-based intervention models focusing on open-communication, mutual respect, and compassion.
DescriptionPoster abstracts
This free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (a joint conference of the International Psycho-Oncology Society and the American Psychosocial Oncology Society) 28 July-1 August 2015 Washington, DC, USA
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218182
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWan, AHY-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PPY-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:27:42Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:27:42Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 17th World Congress of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS 2015), Washington, DC., 28 July-1 August 2015. In Psycho-Oncology, 2015, v. 24 suppl. S2, p. 270, abstract P2-78-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218182-
dc.descriptionPoster abstracts-
dc.descriptionThis free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (a joint conference of the International Psycho-Oncology Society and the American Psychosocial Oncology Society) 28 July-1 August 2015 Washington, DC, USA-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Social support is regarded as catalyst of thriving for people recovering from cancer. Nevertheless, little research has been dedicated to explore how different aspects of social support may benefit psychological growth in trauma. METHODS: 75 Chinese women with breast cancer, attending out-patient clinic, were surveyed using a questionnaire packet composing of validated scales in Chinese on post-traumatic growth, perceived social support, and relevant demographics. Regression analyses were conducted to explore the associations between aspects of social support and dimensions of post-traumatic growth. RESULTS: Controlling on age, marital status, religiosity, and treatment modality, positive social interaction was associated with post-traumatic growth of self (β = 0.08, p ≤ 0.05), interpersonal connectedness (β=0.06, p≤ 0.01), life orientation (β=0.04, p≤ 0.05) and spirituality (β=0.06, p≤ 0.01). Emotional-informational support was associated with growths in connectedness (β=0.05, p≤ 0.05), life orientation (β=0.03, p≤ 0.01) and spirituality (β=0.05, p≤ 0.05). In addition, affectionate support was associated with self (β=0.11, p≤ 0.01) and interpersonal growth (β=0.05, p≤ 0.01), while tangible support only associated with interpersonal growth (β=0.04, p≤ 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Perceived social support is positively associated with post-traumatic growth for Chinese recovering from breast cancer; whereas different dimensions of social support appeared to contribute differently to post-traumatic growth. Perceived positive social interactions appeared to be a prominent factor associated with all dimensions of post-traumatic growth. Research Implications: Very few studies explore the impact of different kinds of social support on promoting positive coping outcomes among people with cancer. Results in the present study suggested that different kind of social support might contribute to a different aspect of post-traumatic growth, future research studies may consider exploring the relationships of different type of social support and other coping outcomes, so that specific intervention models could be developed to help family with cancer cope. Practice Implications: Findings of the present study highlighted the importance of family-based interventions in helping people with cancer cope in the Chinese community. It appeared that interpersonal connectedness be the catalyst for all aspects of post-traumatic growth, while the impact of tangible support appeared benign. The findings lean support to family-based intervention models focusing on open-communication, mutual respect, and compassion.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOncology psychology medical sciences-
dc.subjectPsychiatry and neurology-
dc.titleRethinking social support and post-traumatic growth: a cross-sectional study of Chinese with breast cancer-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailWan, AHY: awan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, PPY: pamelalt@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, PPY=rp00585-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.3874-
dc.identifier.hkuros253776-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S2-
dc.identifier.spage270, abstract P2-78-
dc.identifier.epage270, abstract P2-78-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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