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Conference Paper: Use of complementary and alternative medicine among Chinese breast cancer patients

TitleUse of complementary and alternative medicine among Chinese breast cancer patients
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Oncology psychology medical sciences
Psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2014
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 16th World Congress of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS 2014), Lisbon, Portugal, 20-24 October 2014. In Psycho-Oncology, 2014, v. 23 suppl. S3, p. 314-315, abstract P2-0649 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has raised in past decades. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) classified CAM to five categories: Alternative medical systems, Mindbody interventions, Biologically-based therapies, Manipulative and Body-based methods and Energy Therapies. Some of the CAM, Traditional Chinese Medicine, has widely been used by people. However, little is known about other CAM. This study aims at revealing the use of CAM among Chinese breast cancer patients. METHOD: Subjects were 140 Chinese cancer patients were recruited from two local hospitals and community cancer support organization in Hong Kong. All of them finished their chemotherapy treatment and about to start their radiotherapy treatment. In participate into this study, participants were asked to fill in a set of self-reported questionnaires for assessing psychological health and their habit of using CAM. RESULTS: For purpose of analysis, CAM list were classified according to the NCCAM 5 categories: Alternative medical systems (Acupuncture & Traditional Chinese medicine), Mind-body interventions (Guided imagery & Mindfulness), Biologically-based therapies (Diet & Dietary supplements), Manipulative and Body-based methods (Acupressure & Reflexology) and Energy Therapies (Tai-chi & Qigong). 79 of 140 participants (56.4%) indicated the use of CAM before their commencement of radiotherapy. Among 79 participants, 47 of them (59.4%) were only using one type of CAM. Biologically-based therapies was the most commonly used CAM among our participants. 13.9% (11 out of 79 participants) used more than 3 types of CAM. CONCLUSIONS: Our research found out that the use of CAM was common among Chinese breast cancer patients. More than half of them used at least one type of CAM. The prevalence of using CAM was high. Moreover, around 40% used even more than one type of CAM. Lastly, diet and dietary supplements were the most commonly used CAM among our participants. It showed the importance of dietary care among Chinese female patients. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: Limited research had been done on finding out the prevalence of using CAM among Chinese cancer patients. The malpractice of using CAM might cause negative side- effects on cancer patients, as well as affecting the mainstream health care approaches. Scientific studies would be needed on collecting evidence on evaluating the effectiveness of the use of CAM among cancer patients. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: For providing psychosocial intervention for Chinese breast cancer patients, clinician and practitioner should address on the importance on the role of CAM. Apart from providing mainstream health care approaches information, clinician should be well-equipped on the other CAM approaches like acupressure massage or qigong practice. Cancer patients could be more benefited from various psychosocial groups.
DescriptionPoster abstracts
This free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the IPOS 16th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, 20-24 October 2014, Lisbon, Portugal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218152
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, IKM-
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTH-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.contributor.authorLo, PHY-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKP-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, MY-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:25:20Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:25:20Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 16th World Congress of the International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS 2014), Lisbon, Portugal, 20-24 October 2014. In Psycho-Oncology, 2014, v. 23 suppl. S3, p. 314-315, abstract P2-0649-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/218152-
dc.descriptionPoster abstracts-
dc.descriptionThis free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the IPOS 16th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, 20-24 October 2014, Lisbon, Portugal-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has raised in past decades. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) classified CAM to five categories: Alternative medical systems, Mindbody interventions, Biologically-based therapies, Manipulative and Body-based methods and Energy Therapies. Some of the CAM, Traditional Chinese Medicine, has widely been used by people. However, little is known about other CAM. This study aims at revealing the use of CAM among Chinese breast cancer patients. METHOD: Subjects were 140 Chinese cancer patients were recruited from two local hospitals and community cancer support organization in Hong Kong. All of them finished their chemotherapy treatment and about to start their radiotherapy treatment. In participate into this study, participants were asked to fill in a set of self-reported questionnaires for assessing psychological health and their habit of using CAM. RESULTS: For purpose of analysis, CAM list were classified according to the NCCAM 5 categories: Alternative medical systems (Acupuncture & Traditional Chinese medicine), Mind-body interventions (Guided imagery & Mindfulness), Biologically-based therapies (Diet & Dietary supplements), Manipulative and Body-based methods (Acupressure & Reflexology) and Energy Therapies (Tai-chi & Qigong). 79 of 140 participants (56.4%) indicated the use of CAM before their commencement of radiotherapy. Among 79 participants, 47 of them (59.4%) were only using one type of CAM. Biologically-based therapies was the most commonly used CAM among our participants. 13.9% (11 out of 79 participants) used more than 3 types of CAM. CONCLUSIONS: Our research found out that the use of CAM was common among Chinese breast cancer patients. More than half of them used at least one type of CAM. The prevalence of using CAM was high. Moreover, around 40% used even more than one type of CAM. Lastly, diet and dietary supplements were the most commonly used CAM among our participants. It showed the importance of dietary care among Chinese female patients. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: Limited research had been done on finding out the prevalence of using CAM among Chinese cancer patients. The malpractice of using CAM might cause negative side- effects on cancer patients, as well as affecting the mainstream health care approaches. Scientific studies would be needed on collecting evidence on evaluating the effectiveness of the use of CAM among cancer patients. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: For providing psychosocial intervention for Chinese breast cancer patients, clinician and practitioner should address on the importance on the role of CAM. Apart from providing mainstream health care approaches information, clinician should be well-equipped on the other CAM approaches like acupressure massage or qigong practice. Cancer patients could be more benefited from various psychosocial groups.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOncology psychology medical sciences-
dc.subjectPsychiatry and neurology-
dc.titleUse of complementary and alternative medicine among Chinese breast cancer patients-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, IKM: irenech@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, MY: myluk@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1099-1611.2014.3696-
dc.identifier.hkuros251374-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S3-
dc.identifier.spage314, abstract P2-0649-
dc.identifier.epage315-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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