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Article: 'The only language we speak really well'. The English creoles of Equatorial Guinea and West Africa at the intersection of language ideologies and language policies

Title'The only language we speak really well'. The English creoles of Equatorial Guinea and West Africa at the intersection of language ideologies and language policies
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherDe Gruyter Mouton. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.de/journals/ijsl
Citation
International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 2016, v. 239, p. 211-234 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article explores the nexus between language policies and language ideologies in Equatorial Guinea and West Africa. By analyzing spoken and written discourses in Spanish and Pichi, I identify a set of ideas and beliefs about Pichi and the semiotic processes by which they have emerged. The comparison of Pichi with Krio, Nigerian Pidgin, Cameroon Pidgin and Ghanaian Pidgin English shows that Pichi is the most disadvantaged of the West African English-lexicon creoles with respect to a number of sociolinguistic characteristics. I argue that linguistic ideologies about Pichi have contributed significantly to disregarding language policy options for elevating the status and extending the uses of Pichi in Equatorial Guinea. Pichi is nevertheless projected to expand its social functions by gradually conquering additional domains of use as has been the case with the other English creoles of West Africa.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217978

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, K-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T06:20:10Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T06:20:10Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of the Sociology of Language, 2016, v. 239, p. 211-234-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217978-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the nexus between language policies and language ideologies in Equatorial Guinea and West Africa. By analyzing spoken and written discourses in Spanish and Pichi, I identify a set of ideas and beliefs about Pichi and the semiotic processes by which they have emerged. The comparison of Pichi with Krio, Nigerian Pidgin, Cameroon Pidgin and Ghanaian Pidgin English shows that Pichi is the most disadvantaged of the West African English-lexicon creoles with respect to a number of sociolinguistic characteristics. I argue that linguistic ideologies about Pichi have contributed significantly to disregarding language policy options for elevating the status and extending the uses of Pichi in Equatorial Guinea. Pichi is nevertheless projected to expand its social functions by gradually conquering additional domains of use as has been the case with the other English creoles of West Africa.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherDe Gruyter Mouton. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.de/journals/ijsl-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of the Sociology of Language-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at www.degruyter.com-
dc.title'The only language we speak really well'. The English creoles of Equatorial Guinea and West Africa at the intersection of language ideologies and language policies-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715-
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/ijsl-2016-0010-
dc.identifier.hkuros251918-
dc.publisher.placeBerlin-

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