File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The Effect of Self-Control on the Construction of Risk Perceptions

TitleThe Effect of Self-Control on the Construction of Risk Perceptions
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherINFORMS. The Journal's web site is located at http://mansci.pubs.informs.org
Citation
Management Science, 2015, v. 61 n. 9, p. 2259-2280 How to Cite?
AbstractWe show that the way decision makers construct risk perceptions is systematically influenced by their level of self-control: low self-control results in greater weighting of probability and reduced weighting of consequences of negative outcomes in formulating overall threat perceptions. Seven studies demonstrate such distorted risk construction in wide-ranging risk domains. The effects hold for both chronic and manipulated levels of perceived self-control and are observed only for risks involving high personal agency (e.g., overeating, smoking, drinking). As an important implication of our results, we also demonstrate that those lower (higher) in self-control show relatively less (more) interest in products and lifestyle changes reducing consequences (e.g., a pill that heals liver damage from drinking) than those reducing likelihood of risks (e.g., a pill that prevents liver damage from drinking). We also explore several possible underlying processes for the observed effect and discuss the theoretical and managerial relevance of our findings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217306
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.741
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.384

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJia, SJ-
dc.contributor.authorKhan, U-
dc.contributor.authorLitt, A-
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-18T05:55:32Z-
dc.date.available2015-09-18T05:55:32Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationManagement Science, 2015, v. 61 n. 9, p. 2259-2280-
dc.identifier.issn0025-1909-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/217306-
dc.description.abstractWe show that the way decision makers construct risk perceptions is systematically influenced by their level of self-control: low self-control results in greater weighting of probability and reduced weighting of consequences of negative outcomes in formulating overall threat perceptions. Seven studies demonstrate such distorted risk construction in wide-ranging risk domains. The effects hold for both chronic and manipulated levels of perceived self-control and are observed only for risks involving high personal agency (e.g., overeating, smoking, drinking). As an important implication of our results, we also demonstrate that those lower (higher) in self-control show relatively less (more) interest in products and lifestyle changes reducing consequences (e.g., a pill that heals liver damage from drinking) than those reducing likelihood of risks (e.g., a pill that prevents liver damage from drinking). We also explore several possible underlying processes for the observed effect and discuss the theoretical and managerial relevance of our findings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherINFORMS. The Journal's web site is located at http://mansci.pubs.informs.org-
dc.relation.ispartofManagement Science-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe Effect of Self-Control on the Construction of Risk Perceptions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJia, SJ: jjia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJia, SJ=rp01801-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1287/mnsc.2014.2098-
dc.identifier.hkuros250619-
dc.identifier.volume61-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage2259-
dc.identifier.epage2280-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats