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Article: Thermoresponsive gelatin/monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L- lactide) hydrogels: Formulation, characterization, and antibacterial drug delivery

TitleThermoresponsive gelatin/monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L- lactide) hydrogels: Formulation, characterization, and antibacterial drug delivery
Authors
KeywordsIn vitro degradation
Tissue engineering
Thermoresponsive
Rheology
Gentamicin sulfate
Issue Date2006
Citation
Pharmaceutical Research, 2006, v. 23, n. 1, p. 205-214 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose. The primary objective of this study was to prepare novel thermoresponsive binary component hydrogels composed of gelatin and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactide) (MPEG-PDLLA) diblock copolymer and to obtain optimal formulations capable of forming gels upon a narrow temperature range between body temperature and room temperature. Methods. MPEG-PDLLA diblock copolymers with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) feature were synthesized by using a ring-opening polymerization method. The starting weight ratio of MPEG/DLLA was varied to obtain a series of copolymers with a wide range of molecular weight and hydrophilicity. The copolymers were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. MPEG (2K)-PDLLA (1:4) was chosen to construct hydrogels with gelatin. To obtain optimal thermoresponsive formulation, various hydrogels were formulated and quantified in terms of sol-gel phase transition kinetics and rheological properties. Selected hydrogels were studied as drug carrier for gentamicin sulfate. Results. Gelatin/MPEG-PDLLA hydrogels underwent gelation in less than 15 min when 30 wt.% MPEG (2K)-PDLLA (1:4) was mixed with 10, 50, or 100 mg/mL gelatin. Hydrogels showed rapid gelation when 100 mg/mL gelatin was mixed with 15, 20, or 25 wt.% MPEG-PDLLA as temperature fell from 37°C to room temperature. The viscosity of hydrogels depended on the frequency applied in the rheological tests, the environment temperature, and the concentration of both polymer components. The time needed for 50% gentamicin sulfate release was 5 days or longer at room temperature, and the release lasted up to 40 days. 1H NMR confirmed that MPEG-PDLLA hydrolyzed under in vitro situations. Conclusions. The incorporation of a second polymer component MPEG-PDLLA into the gelatin hydrogel could modify the thermal characteristic of gelatin and the resulting binary component hydrogels obtained different thermal characteristics from the individual polymer components. Formulation of gelatin/MPEG-PDLLA hydrogels could be varied for obtaining such gels that can undergo gelation promptly upon a narrow temperature change. © 2006 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216182
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.26
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.189

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Hu-
dc.contributor.authorKao, Weiyuan John-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T10:22:15Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-25T10:22:15Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationPharmaceutical Research, 2006, v. 23, n. 1, p. 205-214-
dc.identifier.issn0724-8741-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216182-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. The primary objective of this study was to prepare novel thermoresponsive binary component hydrogels composed of gelatin and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactide) (MPEG-PDLLA) diblock copolymer and to obtain optimal formulations capable of forming gels upon a narrow temperature range between body temperature and room temperature. Methods. MPEG-PDLLA diblock copolymers with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) feature were synthesized by using a ring-opening polymerization method. The starting weight ratio of MPEG/DLLA was varied to obtain a series of copolymers with a wide range of molecular weight and hydrophilicity. The copolymers were characterized by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and thermogravimetric analysis. MPEG (2K)-PDLLA (1:4) was chosen to construct hydrogels with gelatin. To obtain optimal thermoresponsive formulation, various hydrogels were formulated and quantified in terms of sol-gel phase transition kinetics and rheological properties. Selected hydrogels were studied as drug carrier for gentamicin sulfate. Results. Gelatin/MPEG-PDLLA hydrogels underwent gelation in less than 15 min when 30 wt.% MPEG (2K)-PDLLA (1:4) was mixed with 10, 50, or 100 mg/mL gelatin. Hydrogels showed rapid gelation when 100 mg/mL gelatin was mixed with 15, 20, or 25 wt.% MPEG-PDLLA as temperature fell from 37°C to room temperature. The viscosity of hydrogels depended on the frequency applied in the rheological tests, the environment temperature, and the concentration of both polymer components. The time needed for 50% gentamicin sulfate release was 5 days or longer at room temperature, and the release lasted up to 40 days. 1H NMR confirmed that MPEG-PDLLA hydrolyzed under in vitro situations. Conclusions. The incorporation of a second polymer component MPEG-PDLLA into the gelatin hydrogel could modify the thermal characteristic of gelatin and the resulting binary component hydrogels obtained different thermal characteristics from the individual polymer components. Formulation of gelatin/MPEG-PDLLA hydrogels could be varied for obtaining such gels that can undergo gelation promptly upon a narrow temperature change. © 2006 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPharmaceutical Research-
dc.subjectIn vitro degradation-
dc.subjectTissue engineering-
dc.subjectThermoresponsive-
dc.subjectRheology-
dc.subjectGentamicin sulfate-
dc.titleThermoresponsive gelatin/monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L- lactide) hydrogels: Formulation, characterization, and antibacterial drug delivery-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11095-005-8417-z-
dc.identifier.pmid16270162-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-32244448545-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage205-
dc.identifier.epage214-

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