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Article: In vivo biocompatibility and biostability of modified polyurethanes

TitleIn vivo biocompatibility and biostability of modified polyurethanes
Authors
Issue Date1997
Citation
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, 1997, v. 36, n. 2, p. 246-257 How to Cite?
AbstractModified segmented polyurethanes were examined for biostability and biocompatibility using an in vivo cage implant system for time intervals of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 weeks. Two types of materials were used: polyether polyurethanes and polycarbonate polyurethanes. Two unmodified polyether polyurethanes (PEUU A' and SPU-PRM), one PDMS endcapped polyether polyurethane (SPU-S), and two polycarbonate polyurethanes (SPU-PCU and SPU- C) were investigated in this study. Techniques used to characterize untreated materials were dynamic water contact angle, stress-strain analysis, and gel permeation chromatography. Cellular response was measured by exudate analysis and by macrophage and foreign body giant cell (FBGC) densities. Material characterization, postimplantation, was done by attenuated total reflectance- Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) in order to quantify biodegradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to qualitatively describe the cellular response and biodegradation. The exudate analysis showed that the acute and chronic inflammatoryresponses for all materials were similar. Lower FBGC densities and cell coverage on SPU-S were attributed to the hydrophobic surface provided by the PDMS endgroups. The polycarbonate polyurethanes did not show any significant differences in cell coverage or FBGC densities even though the macrophage densities were slightly lower compared to polyether polyurethanes. By 10 weeks, biodegradation in the case of PEUU A' and SPU-PRM was extensive as compared to SPU-S because the PDMS endcaps of SPU-S provided a shield against the oxygen radicals secreted by macrophages and FBGCs and lowered the rate of biodegradation. In the case of polycarbonate polyurethanes, the oxidative stability of the carbonate linkage lowered the rate of biodegradation tremendously as compared to the polyether polyurethanes (including SPU-S). The minor amount of biodegradation seen in polycarbonate polyurethanes at 10 weeks was attributed to hydrolysis of the carbonate linkage. | Modified segmented polyether polyurethanes and polycarbonate polyurethanes were examined for biostability and biocompatibility using an in vivo cage implant system. Acute and chronic inflammatory responses were similar for all materials. The polycarbonate polyurethanes did not show any significant differences in cell coverage of foreign body giant cell densities and the macrophage densities were slightly lower compared to polyether polyurethanes. The oxidative stability of the carbonate linkage of polycarbonate polyurethanes lowered the rate of biodegradation tremendously as compared to the polyether polyurethanes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216151
ISSN
2004 Impact Factor: 3.652
2006 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.474

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMathur, A. B.-
dc.contributor.authorCollier, T. O.-
dc.contributor.authorKao, W. J.-
dc.contributor.authorWiggins, M.-
dc.contributor.authorSchubert, M. A.-
dc.contributor.authorHiltner, A.-
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, J. M.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T10:21:57Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-25T10:21:57Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biomedical Materials Research, 1997, v. 36, n. 2, p. 246-257-
dc.identifier.issn0021-9304-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216151-
dc.description.abstractModified segmented polyurethanes were examined for biostability and biocompatibility using an in vivo cage implant system for time intervals of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 weeks. Two types of materials were used: polyether polyurethanes and polycarbonate polyurethanes. Two unmodified polyether polyurethanes (PEUU A' and SPU-PRM), one PDMS endcapped polyether polyurethane (SPU-S), and two polycarbonate polyurethanes (SPU-PCU and SPU- C) were investigated in this study. Techniques used to characterize untreated materials were dynamic water contact angle, stress-strain analysis, and gel permeation chromatography. Cellular response was measured by exudate analysis and by macrophage and foreign body giant cell (FBGC) densities. Material characterization, postimplantation, was done by attenuated total reflectance- Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) in order to quantify biodegradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to qualitatively describe the cellular response and biodegradation. The exudate analysis showed that the acute and chronic inflammatoryresponses for all materials were similar. Lower FBGC densities and cell coverage on SPU-S were attributed to the hydrophobic surface provided by the PDMS endgroups. The polycarbonate polyurethanes did not show any significant differences in cell coverage or FBGC densities even though the macrophage densities were slightly lower compared to polyether polyurethanes. By 10 weeks, biodegradation in the case of PEUU A' and SPU-PRM was extensive as compared to SPU-S because the PDMS endcaps of SPU-S provided a shield against the oxygen radicals secreted by macrophages and FBGCs and lowered the rate of biodegradation. In the case of polycarbonate polyurethanes, the oxidative stability of the carbonate linkage lowered the rate of biodegradation tremendously as compared to the polyether polyurethanes (including SPU-S). The minor amount of biodegradation seen in polycarbonate polyurethanes at 10 weeks was attributed to hydrolysis of the carbonate linkage. | Modified segmented polyether polyurethanes and polycarbonate polyurethanes were examined for biostability and biocompatibility using an in vivo cage implant system. Acute and chronic inflammatory responses were similar for all materials. The polycarbonate polyurethanes did not show any significant differences in cell coverage of foreign body giant cell densities and the macrophage densities were slightly lower compared to polyether polyurethanes. The oxidative stability of the carbonate linkage of polycarbonate polyurethanes lowered the rate of biodegradation tremendously as compared to the polyether polyurethanes.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomedical Materials Research-
dc.titleIn vivo biocompatibility and biostability of modified polyurethanes-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1097-4636(199708)36:2<246::AID-JBM14>3.0.CO;2-E-
dc.identifier.pmid9261687-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031213712-
dc.identifier.volume36-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage246-
dc.identifier.epage257-

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