File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Affecting relations: domesticating the internet in a south-western Chinese town

TitleAffecting relations: domesticating the internet in a south-western Chinese town
Authors
KeywordsChina
Communication studies
Domestication of ICTs
Ethnography
Internet
Young people
Issue Date2015
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369118X.asp
Citation
Information, Communication and Society, 2015, v. 18 n. 1, p. 17-31 How to Cite?
AbstractDrawing on data gathered during ethnographic fieldwork in a south-western Chinese town, this paper examines a detailed case study of a single family, and how their internet use transformed over an 18-month period following the introduction of home broadband to their house. Despite initial intentions that the connection would resolve the problem of errant offspring accessing the internet outside the home, the subsequent effects that home internet brought upon domestic life were largely unforeseen. The detailed narrative presented herein highlights how different family members' perceptions and actual use of the internet generated multiple contradictions over the fieldwork period. This paper argues that Silverstone, R., Hirsch, E., & Morley, D.’s (1992). Information and communication technologies and the moral economy of the household. In R. Silverstone & E. Hirsch (Eds.), Consuming technologies: Media and information in domestic spaces (pp. 15–31). London: Routledge] theory of domestication provides the most suitable model for understanding the introduction of information and communication technologies into the home, owing to its capacity to take into account how attitudes towards the internet are renegotiated over time. The paper proposes further refinements be made to the theory by challenging the assumption that users aspire to ‘incorporate’ the technology into the household. Instead, the ethnographic data indicate that the main drivers of the domestication process are family members' desires to use the internet as a way to transform relationships within the household. More broadly, by foregrounding participants' concerns regarding internet use as focusing chiefly on family life and education, this paper also provides an important alternative to prevailing scholarly trends that generally understand the Chinese internet through themes of politics, censorship and democracy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216105
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.109
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.009

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, TN-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T03:00:08Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-25T03:00:08Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationInformation, Communication and Society, 2015, v. 18 n. 1, p. 17-31-
dc.identifier.issn1369-118X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/216105-
dc.description.abstractDrawing on data gathered during ethnographic fieldwork in a south-western Chinese town, this paper examines a detailed case study of a single family, and how their internet use transformed over an 18-month period following the introduction of home broadband to their house. Despite initial intentions that the connection would resolve the problem of errant offspring accessing the internet outside the home, the subsequent effects that home internet brought upon domestic life were largely unforeseen. The detailed narrative presented herein highlights how different family members' perceptions and actual use of the internet generated multiple contradictions over the fieldwork period. This paper argues that Silverstone, R., Hirsch, E., & Morley, D.’s (1992). Information and communication technologies and the moral economy of the household. In R. Silverstone & E. Hirsch (Eds.), Consuming technologies: Media and information in domestic spaces (pp. 15–31). London: Routledge] theory of domestication provides the most suitable model for understanding the introduction of information and communication technologies into the home, owing to its capacity to take into account how attitudes towards the internet are renegotiated over time. The paper proposes further refinements be made to the theory by challenging the assumption that users aspire to ‘incorporate’ the technology into the household. Instead, the ethnographic data indicate that the main drivers of the domestication process are family members' desires to use the internet as a way to transform relationships within the household. More broadly, by foregrounding participants' concerns regarding internet use as focusing chiefly on family life and education, this paper also provides an important alternative to prevailing scholarly trends that generally understand the Chinese internet through themes of politics, censorship and democracy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369118X.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofInformation, Communication and Society-
dc.rightsPostprint: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group inInformation, Communication and Society on 2015, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2014.924981-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectCommunication studies-
dc.subjectDomestication of ICTs-
dc.subjectEthnography-
dc.subjectInternet-
dc.subjectYoung people-
dc.titleAffecting relations: domesticating the internet in a south-western Chinese town-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMcDonald, TN: mcdonald@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMcDonald, TN=rp02060-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1369118X.2014.924981-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84919865614-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage17-
dc.identifier.epage31-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats