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Article: Building integrated project and asset management teams for sustainable built infrastructure development

TitleBuilding integrated project and asset management teams for sustainable built infrastructure development
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/jfm/jfm.jsp
Citation
Journal of Facilities Management, 2014, v. 12 n. 3, p. 187-210 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose – This paper aims to investigate the relevance of the relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) concept for integrating project management (PM) and asset management (AM) for total asset management (TAM). The specific objectives are to test the RIVANS for TAM concept postulated by Kumaraswamy (2011) and Kumaraswamy et al. (2012); discover ways to enable PM and AM teams to work in an integrated manner; and recommend strategies and operational measures to promote greater team integration in the industry. Design/methodology/approach – This study is based in Hong Kong with parallel studies in the UK, Singapore and Sri Lanka. Through a comprehensive questionnaire, a case study on an organization engaged in both design and construction and operations and maintenance (O&M) works, interviews and hosting a workshop (all conducted with experienced industry practitioners and experts), a set of recommendations are derived to guide the industry toward greater team integration. Findings – Early involvement of O&M staff is important for better anticipating obstacles and learning from past experiences, but PM and AM teams generally work independently with limited interaction. Priorities of the stakeholders are often different. Knowledge management is increasingly important, but knowledge sharing is not always a priority. The three focus areas in the set of recommendations developed from Hong Kong are: organizational/management structure, procurement strategies and operational mechanisms; fostering culture of team building and providing additional means of communication; and informal communication tools. Originality/value – There has been little research into the communication, interaction and integration between PM and AM priorities and teams. However, increasing industry emphasis on sustainable buildings, end-user satisfaction and designing for maintainability dictates that PM and AM teams must work closer together, hence the imperative for mapping useful directions to be pursued.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215195
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, KWK-
dc.contributor.authorKumaraswamy, MM-
dc.contributor.authorMahesh, G-
dc.contributor.authorLing, FYY-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T13:17:41Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T13:17:41Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Facilities Management, 2014, v. 12 n. 3, p. 187-210-
dc.identifier.issn1472-5967-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/215195-
dc.description.abstractPurpose – This paper aims to investigate the relevance of the relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) concept for integrating project management (PM) and asset management (AM) for total asset management (TAM). The specific objectives are to test the RIVANS for TAM concept postulated by Kumaraswamy (2011) and Kumaraswamy et al. (2012); discover ways to enable PM and AM teams to work in an integrated manner; and recommend strategies and operational measures to promote greater team integration in the industry. Design/methodology/approach – This study is based in Hong Kong with parallel studies in the UK, Singapore and Sri Lanka. Through a comprehensive questionnaire, a case study on an organization engaged in both design and construction and operations and maintenance (O&M) works, interviews and hosting a workshop (all conducted with experienced industry practitioners and experts), a set of recommendations are derived to guide the industry toward greater team integration. Findings – Early involvement of O&M staff is important for better anticipating obstacles and learning from past experiences, but PM and AM teams generally work independently with limited interaction. Priorities of the stakeholders are often different. Knowledge management is increasingly important, but knowledge sharing is not always a priority. The three focus areas in the set of recommendations developed from Hong Kong are: organizational/management structure, procurement strategies and operational mechanisms; fostering culture of team building and providing additional means of communication; and informal communication tools. Originality/value – There has been little research into the communication, interaction and integration between PM and AM priorities and teams. However, increasing industry emphasis on sustainable buildings, end-user satisfaction and designing for maintainability dictates that PM and AM teams must work closer together, hence the imperative for mapping useful directions to be pursued.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/jfm/jfm.jsp-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Facilities Management-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleBuilding integrated project and asset management teams for sustainable built infrastructure development-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, KWK: kelwinw@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKumaraswamy, MM: mohan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKumaraswamy, MM=rp00126-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JFM-05-2013-0025-
dc.identifier.hkuros248570-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage187-
dc.identifier.epage210-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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