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Conference Paper: Facile 3D metal electrode fabrication for energy applications via inkjet printing and shape memory polymer

TitleFacile 3D metal electrode fabrication for energy applications via inkjet printing and shape memory polymer
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/conf
Citation
The 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014), Awaji Island, Hyogo, Japan, 18–21 November 2014. In Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2014, v. 557, article no. 012006 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper reports on a simple 3D metal electrode fabrication technique via inkjet printing onto a thermally contracting shape memory polymer (SMP) substrate. Inkjet printing allows for the direct patterning of structures from metal nanoparticle bearing liquid inks. After deposition, these inks require thermal curing steps to render a stable conductive film. By printing onto a SMP substrate, the metal nanoparticle ink can be cured and substrate shrunk simultaneously to create 3D metal microstructures, forming a large surface area topology well suited for energy applications. Polystyrene SMP shrinkage was characterized in a laboratory oven from 150-240°C, resulting in a size reduction of 1.97-2.58. Silver nanoparticle ink was patterned into electrodes, shrunk, and the topology characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Zinc-Silver Oxide microbatteries were fabricated to demonstrate the 3D electrodes compared to planar references. Characterization was performed using 10M potassium hydroxide electrolyte solution doped with zinc oxide (57g/L). After a 300s oxidation at 3Vdc, the 3D electrode battery demonstrated a 125% increased capacity over the reference cell. Reference cells degraded with longer oxidations, but the 3D electrodes were fully oxidized for 4 hours, and exhibited a capacity of 5.5mA-hr/cm2 with stable metal performance.
DescriptionThis journal vol. entitled: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014) ... Japan
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214826
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.211

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, RC-
dc.contributor.authorWu, J-
dc.contributor.authorHau, NY-
dc.contributor.authorChang, YH-
dc.contributor.authorFeng, SP-
dc.contributor.authorLi, DC-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:57:41Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:57:41Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014), Awaji Island, Hyogo, Japan, 18–21 November 2014. In Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2014, v. 557, article no. 012006-
dc.identifier.issn1742-6588-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214826-
dc.descriptionThis journal vol. entitled: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014) ... Japan-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports on a simple 3D metal electrode fabrication technique via inkjet printing onto a thermally contracting shape memory polymer (SMP) substrate. Inkjet printing allows for the direct patterning of structures from metal nanoparticle bearing liquid inks. After deposition, these inks require thermal curing steps to render a stable conductive film. By printing onto a SMP substrate, the metal nanoparticle ink can be cured and substrate shrunk simultaneously to create 3D metal microstructures, forming a large surface area topology well suited for energy applications. Polystyrene SMP shrinkage was characterized in a laboratory oven from 150-240°C, resulting in a size reduction of 1.97-2.58. Silver nanoparticle ink was patterned into electrodes, shrunk, and the topology characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Zinc-Silver Oxide microbatteries were fabricated to demonstrate the 3D electrodes compared to planar references. Characterization was performed using 10M potassium hydroxide electrolyte solution doped with zinc oxide (57g/L). After a 300s oxidation at 3Vdc, the 3D electrode battery demonstrated a 125% increased capacity over the reference cell. Reference cells degraded with longer oxidations, but the 3D electrodes were fully oxidized for 4 hours, and exhibited a capacity of 5.5mA-hr/cm2 with stable metal performance.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iop.org/EJ/journal/conf-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physics: Conference Series-
dc.rightsJournal of Physics: Conference Series. Copyright © Institute of Physics Publishing.-
dc.rightsThis is an author-created, un-copyedited version of an article published in [insert name of journal]. IOP Publishing Ltd is not responsible for any errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or any version derived from it. The Version of Record is available online at [insert DOI].-
dc.titleFacile 3D metal electrode fabrication for energy applications via inkjet printing and shape memory polymer-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailRoberts, RC: rcr8@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFeng, SP: hpfeng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityRoberts, RC=rp01738-
dc.identifier.authorityFeng, SP=rp01533-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1742-6596/557/1/012006-
dc.identifier.hkuros249615-
dc.identifier.hkuros251827-
dc.identifier.volume557-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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