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Article: The moderating effects of age in the relationships of job autonomy to work outcomes.

TitleThe moderating effects of age in the relationships of job autonomy to work outcomes.
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://workar.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Work, Aging and Retirement, 2015, v. 1 n. 1, p. 64-78 How to Cite?
AbstractGuided by socio-emotional selectivity theory, the article proposes 2 competing hypotheses regarding whether older workers react more or less positively to job autonomy than younger workers do. In a meta-analysis of 415 empirical samples, we observed that job autonomy was positively and significantly related to a wide variety of positive work outcomes (in both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs). The results provide partial support for each hypothesis. For example, the relationships of job autonomy to job self-efficacy and job performance were stronger for older workers, but the relationships of job autonomy to job satisfaction and affective commitment were weaker for older workers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214702
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, TWH-
dc.contributor.authorFeldman, DC-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:52:06Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:52:06Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationWork, Aging and Retirement, 2015, v. 1 n. 1, p. 64-78-
dc.identifier.issn2054-4642-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214702-
dc.description.abstractGuided by socio-emotional selectivity theory, the article proposes 2 competing hypotheses regarding whether older workers react more or less positively to job autonomy than younger workers do. In a meta-analysis of 415 empirical samples, we observed that job autonomy was positively and significantly related to a wide variety of positive work outcomes (in both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs). The results provide partial support for each hypothesis. For example, the relationships of job autonomy to job self-efficacy and job performance were stronger for older workers, but the relationships of job autonomy to job satisfaction and affective commitment were weaker for older workers.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://workar.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofWork, Aging and Retirement-
dc.titleThe moderating effects of age in the relationships of job autonomy to work outcomes.-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, TWH: tng@business.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TWH=rp01088-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/workar/wau003-
dc.identifier.hkuros246303-
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage64-
dc.identifier.epage78-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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