File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Relationship between individual differences in speech processing and cognitive functions

TitleRelationship between individual differences in speech processing and cognitive functions
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychonomic.org/PBR/
Citation
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractA growing body of research has suggested that cognitive abilities may play a role in individual differences in speech processing. The present study took advantage of a widespread linguistic phenomenon of sound change to systematically assess the relationships between speech processing and various components of attention and working memory in the auditory and visual modalities among typically-developed Cantonese-speaking individuals. The individual variations in speech processing are captured in an on-going sound change - tone merging in Hong Kong Cantonese, in which typically-developed native speakers are reported to lose the distinctions between some tonal contrasts in perception and/or production. Three groups of participants were recruited, with one group of good perception and production, a second group of good perception but poor production and a third group of good production but poor perception. Our findings revealed that modality-independent abilities of attentional switching/control and working memory might contribute to individual differences in patterns of speech perception and production as well as discrimination latencies among typically-developed speakers. The findings not only have the potential to generalize to speech processing in other languages, but also broaden our understanding of the omnipresent phenomenon of language change in all languages.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214557

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOU, J-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SP-
dc.contributor.authorFung, R-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:37:52Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:37:52Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationPsychonomic Bulletin & Review, 2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214557-
dc.description.abstractA growing body of research has suggested that cognitive abilities may play a role in individual differences in speech processing. The present study took advantage of a widespread linguistic phenomenon of sound change to systematically assess the relationships between speech processing and various components of attention and working memory in the auditory and visual modalities among typically-developed Cantonese-speaking individuals. The individual variations in speech processing are captured in an on-going sound change - tone merging in Hong Kong Cantonese, in which typically-developed native speakers are reported to lose the distinctions between some tonal contrasts in perception and/or production. Three groups of participants were recruited, with one group of good perception and production, a second group of good perception but poor production and a third group of good production but poor perception. Our findings revealed that modality-independent abilities of attentional switching/control and working memory might contribute to individual differences in patterns of speech perception and production as well as discrimination latencies among typically-developed speakers. The findings not only have the potential to generalize to speech processing in other languages, but also broaden our understanding of the omnipresent phenomenon of language change in all languages.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychonomic.org/PBR/-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychonomic Bulletin & Review-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.titleRelationship between individual differences in speech processing and cognitive functions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920-
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/s13423-015-0839-y-
dc.identifier.hkuros248919-
dc.publisher.placeUSA-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats